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Global Engagement Archives

December 5, 2006

Center for International Business Education and Research

The Illinois Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), one of 31 national resource centers for international business, is a leader in designing and delivering programs that equip future business leaders with language skills, cultural awareness, and the specific business skills needed to be at the vanguard of international business management. Funded by a grant from the US Department of Education, Illinois CIBER coordinates seminars and workshops for professional audiences, funds faculty research on international competitiveness, underwrites development and delivery of new business foreign language courses, develops and sponsors overseas experiences for undergraduate and graduate students, supports an annual international business case competition, serves as a resource for the business community through its Web site, conferences, and consulting, and administers the Certificate in Global Business Culture with Area Specialization. For more information, please contact the center at ciber@business.illinois.edu.

Book
Recommended by Marcelo Bucheli

International Business by Charles W. L. Hill, an international business textbook

Charles Hill draws on his experience in teaching, writing, and global consulting to create a thorough, up-to-date, and thought-provoking text. The book explores the pros and cons of economic theories, government policies, business strategies, and, organizational structures.

Curricula

Foundation for Teaching Economics Lesson Plans
The FTE provides a variety of high-quality professional development opportunities and lesson plans for secondary economics and social studies teachers.


Illinois Council on Economic Education
The ICEE helps K-12 schools integrate the teaching of economics across the curriculum at all grade levels, providing students with fundamental economic concepts and skills.

The Developed Countries and the Promise of Globalization A Resource Guide for K-12 Teachers
The University of Connecticut CIBER created this curriculum for K-12 teachers to teach international economics.

Web Resources
Compiled by Yoo-Seong Song

GlobalEDGE
Created by the Center for International Business Education and Research at Michigan State University (MSU-CIBER), globalEDGE™ is a knowledge web-portal that connects international business professionals worldwide to a wealth of information, insights, and learning resources on global business activities.

IPAnet (Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency of World Bank Group)
Established in 1995 as part of the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency (MIGA’s) mandate to enhance Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in developing regions, the Investment Promotion Network (IPAnet) is the leading international investment-specific portal Web site providing free access to online foreign investment and privatization resources.

CIA World Factbook
The World Factbook is prepared by the Central Intelligence Agency for the use of US Government officials, and the style, format, coverage, and content are designed to meet their specific requirements.

Center for Global Studies

The Center for Global Studies (CGS) is a National Resource Center for the study of globalization under the Title VI program of the Department of Education. CGS has a four-fold mission: 1) to promote and support research to identify the impacts of globalization on the world’s populations and states and to develop strategies to address global issues; 2) to globalize UI across its nine colleges and multiple disciplinary and professional units; 3) to make teaching programs related to global studies available to K-16 students and teachers in Illinois and around the country as well as to businesses, professional and civic organizations, media, governmental agencies, and all members of the interested public; and 4). through its FLAS Fellowships and Title VI grant, support the acquisition of advanced language skills and understanding of other cultures for UI students. For more information, please contact the center at global-studies@illinois.edu.

The following are useful resources for incorporating global perspectives in teaching. These and other resources can be found on the Globalization and Education Web site, which is produced by the Global Studies Education Program at the University of Illinois.

AusAID's Global Education Website
"The site supports the AusAID Global Education Program which aims to raise awareness and understanding among Australian school students of international issues and to prepare them to live in an increasingly globalised world as active citizens." Covers topics from food security to globalization and water rights to human rights.

Commanding Heights
A compelling site for quick, thumbnail descriptions of people, places, and issues for students of globalization. Provided by PBS, the site gives "a comprehensive overview of global economic history" and is aimed at educators, college students, and high school students."

Frontline/World
A Web site, rich with diverse resources for teachers. Part of PBS interactive, this Web site is ideal for secondary school teachers. These sources allow teachers to illustrate parallels between current and historical events and to build critical thinking based on a global context.

Future State: US Department of State for Youth
Intended for students, this site offers news, resources for parents and teachers, and information designed for young people to understand the US Department of State. Check out the "Parents and Educators" page for a variety of activities.

Global Envision
An interesting Web site rich in readable, student-friendly texts on a variety of compelling topics related to globalization. Global Envision believes that the "more that we understand about the free market system . . . the better our chances that the global economy will thrive for the prosperity of all." The Articles menu lists topics such as Environment, General Globalization, and Social Entrepreneurship, each with several related articles. Also check out the Interviews on the Learn page.

Global Exchange
A Web site dedicated to "promoting environmental, political and social justice." Contains a dizzying array of resources, everything from "Fair Trade" coffee, to detailed regional information on various issues, to a very compelling page dedicated to the World Bank and the IMF.

Global Teacher Project
The site to seek if you are interested in how educators in the United Kingdom are tackling the problem of internationalizing their pedagogies. The Global Teacher Project is an effort "to support the inclusion of a global dimension in course content, and to promote global education throughout the training of teachers."

Oxfam Cool Planet for Teachers
"Primarily intended for teachers in England, Scotland and Wales and their students. It aims to bring the global dimension to the classroom, using the concept of Global Citizenship." In particular, the "Global Citizenship" section has a lot of excellent social studies resources. Be sure to check out the "Links" page; it is profound.

Peace Corps' World Wise Schools
Contains information under the pages "educators" and "students". "The World Wise Schools program offers engaging stories, classroom resources, and ideas for service projects based on the experiences of Peace Corps Volunteers around the world."

American Forum for Global Education
A source for global and international education materials for classroom use and professional development, the American Forum for Global Education provides leadership to strengthen the education of our nation's youth by fostering the ability to think creatively, analytically, and systematically about issues in a global context.

Globalist
The "daily online magazine on the global economy, politics and culture." The Teaching Globalization page provides a free set of articles, reports, and editorials related to—believe it or not!—teaching about globalization.

Social Science Research Council (SSRC)
Teaching guides for high school and college classrooms aim to develop the "analytical, reading and writing skills, using the work of international experts in the field of sociology, political science, economics, anthropology, history and geography exposes students to various worldviews, a central component of a well-rounded education."

United Nation's Cyberschool Bus
Features an astonishing array of resources for teachers of all kinds. Impressive materials for teachers as well as students. Start here, no matter what topic you are preparing lessons for.

Youth Zone
Great for history and social studies teachers. The "Teacher" section of "Youth Zone" is a nice set of Web resources from Canada's Human Security Web site, a site affiliated with Canada's Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

Russian, East European and Eurasian Center

The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center is a US Department of Education-designated National Resource Center, committed to providing information and service to K-16 teachers. If you are interested in the Center’s workshops, onsite presentations, or curricular materials, please contact the Center at reec@illinois.edu or check its Web page. The Web page features a special section for K-12 teachers under Outreach, which includes an extensive annotated bibliography of resources, information on the Center’s multimedia lending library, annotated links to relevant Web sites, and more.

Books
Reviewed by Elizabeth Talbot

Corrigan, Jim. Kazakhstan. Harmon, Daniel E. Kyrgyzstan. Robbins, Gerald. Azerbaijan. “The Growth and Influence of Islam in the Nations of Asia and Central Asia” series. Mason Crest Publishers, 2005. (Gr. 8-12)
An emphasis on geopolitics gives these volumes a cohesive focus and an interest level not usually found in country studies. These well-written books are outstanding and would make excellent purchases for both school and public libraries.

Cunningham, Kevin. Joseph Stalin and the Soviet Union. Morgan Reynolds Publishing, 2006. (Gr. 8-12)
This biography of Stalin, which emphasizes his role in the creation and evolution of the Soviet Union, is an engaging read that attends both to the broader historical context and to explanations of Stalin’s brutality. The illustrations—including maps and reproductions of cartoons, posters, and paintings—are an added bonus. The book is an excellent acquisition both for public and school libraries.

Frucht, Richard, ed. Eastern Europe. 3 volumes. ABC-CLIO, 2005. (Gr. 9+)
In this project, “Eastern Europe” applies to countries in Europe’s geographical east that are in various stages of application and membership in the European Union, as well as to the Balkan Peninsula. The essays on individual countries, written by respected social scientists, contain effective comparisons between countries in the region. These volumes provide a useful supplement to the material covered in European history survey courses as well as detailed explanations for students seeking an advanced understanding of the region.

Stoff, Laurie, ed. The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union. “Opposing Viewpoints in World History” series. Gale/Thomson Learning, 2006. (Gr. 11+)
Following a 12-page introduction to Soviet history, each chapter of this book provides several viewpoints on a debatable topic preceded by a summary of background information on that topic. The introductions are good but assume a more complex understanding of Soviet history than such a limited space can offer. The book will be useful for teachers who like the format of the series and can expand on the historical content.

Videos

Faultlines—The Search for Political and Religious Links: Russia 2003
37 min. Films for the Humanities and Social Sciences production.
One of a six-part series, this program examines the resurgence of the Russian Orthodox Church and how its aspirations to spiritual and political power pose a threat to the fundamental freedoms of many Russians. Other documentaries in this series explore the relationship between religion and politics in Israel, Iran, India, Brazil, and the U.S.

Nicholas Winton: The Power of Good 2002, 2005
64 min. Director: Matej Minac. Available through the National Center for Jewish Film at Brandeis University.
Winner of the International Emmy Award in 2002, this Czech-made documentary recounts the story of Nicholas Winton, who arranged the emigration of 669 Jewish children form Czechoslovakia to Great Britain from 1938 to 1939. Children and young adults should identify with the segments focusing on the children’s experiences. An included study guide contains discussion questions on the film and copies of the documents compiled by Winton during his rescue campaign.

Shostakovich against Stalin: The War Symphonies 1997
82 min. Director: Larry Weinstein. Available through Amazon.com.
This exceptionally produced documentary—featuring interviews with Dmitry Shostakovich’s family, friends, and colleagues; contemporary footage; and performances of the composer’s work—performs two related functions very well. First, it examines the relationship between Shostakovich’s musical oeuvre and his experiences under Stalinism, commenting on the composer’s views toward the Soviet regime and its leader. In the process, this documentary also conveys the terror experienced by the cultural elite during Stalin’s purges, the horror of World War II, and the uncertainty of the postwar period.

Web Resources
in memory of the twentieth anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster

Chernobyl Information
This site includes links to facts and news about the disaster; informative online projects such as interviews and testimonies; a glossary of relevant terms; a large bibliography; links to organizations involved in the study or cleanup of Chernobyl and its affects; and more.

Inside Chernobyl
The main page for National Geographic’s April 2006 feature on Chernobyl, with a preview of the print article and links to the story’s photo gallery, field notes from the author, and a map of the soil contamination resulting from the accident.

Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies

The Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (PSAMES) has just become a National Resource Center for the study and teaching of the Middle East, with a Title VI grant from the Department of Education. PSAMES promotes research and teaching on two regions that, together, comprise one-fifth of humanity and are home to five of the world’s major religions and its earliest civilizations. The program regularly organizes lectures, cultural events, symposia, and conferences concerning current events, political cultures and societies of the Middle East and South Asia, and research on Muslim communities worldwide. PSAMES faculty members have led summer abroad programs in Egypt and India in recent years and the program supports the graduate level study of Middle Eastern languages with Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. PSAMES is committed to fostering outreach activities for K-12 and the community. For more information, please contact the center at psames@illinois.edu or visit our website.

Web Resources

On South Asia:
SARAI: South Asia Resource Access on the Net
A comprehensive listing of reference sources, scholars and institutions, and sources by theme

On the Middle East:
Access Islam: A Window into Islamic Holidays, Traditions and Cultures for Students in Grades 4-8
A project of Thirteen/WNET, supported by Title VI funds, this Web site offers video streaming and ever-expanding resources for K-12 teachers to use in the classroom.

Outreach World: A Resource for Teaching Kids about the World
This often-cited Web site includes much curricular information, news, and further resources about the Middle East, and has been partly developed by faculty at Middle East National Resource Centers around the country.

Books

One of the best ways to introduce a region and a culture is through fiction, while recognizing that to teach fiction always entails raising interesting questions about how lived experience and representation intersect. Below is a list of Arabic fiction in translation that might serve well in a high school classroom. This (very incomplete!) list was compiled by Marilyn Booth (Director, PSAMES, and Associate Professor of Comparative and World Literature). She welcomes comments or questions at mbooth@illinois.edu

Works by Nawal El Saadawi, which are numerous and available, are not listed below.

Leila Abouzeid, Year of the Elephant (Morocco)
Etel Adnan, Sitt Marie Rose (Lebanon—French; on the Lebanese civil war)
Radwa Ashour, Grenada (Egypt; historical novel on Muslim Spain at the time of the Inquisition)
Liana Badr, The Eye of the Mirror (Palestine)
My Grandmother’s Cactus: Stories by Egyptian Women (Marilyn Booth, ed. and trans.)
Ulfat Idilbi, Sabriya: Damascus Bittersweet (Syria)
Ulfat Idilbi, Grandfather’s Tale
Sahar Khalifeh, Wild Thorns (Palestine)
Out al-Kouloub, Ramza (Egypt—early 20th century woman’s life)
Alia Mamdouh, Mothballs (Iraq)
Emily Nasrallah, A House Not Her Own (Lebanon)
Emily Nasrallah, September Birds
Ibtihal Salem, Children of the Waters (Egypt, short stories)
Miral al-Tahawy, The Tent (Egypt)
Latifa al-Zayyat, The Open Door (Egypt—1960s feminist classic about a middle-class girl growing up and her country growing toward independence)
Ibrahim Abdel Maguid, The Other Place (Egypt—about migrant workers in Libya)
Hamdi Abu-Golayyel, Thieves in Retirement (Egypt)
Idris Ali, Dongola: A Novel of Nubia (Egypt/Nubian population)
Abbas al-Aswani, The Yacoubian Building (Egypt—daily lives of inhabitants of a building)
Naguib Mahfouz, Midaq Alley (Egypt)
Naguib Mahfouz, The Cairo Trilogy (Palace Walk, Palace of Desire, Sugar Street): celebrated (but long!) fictional panorama of urban Egyptian society from before World War I to mid-century; also very rich in considering family relations and gender relations of that time and place.
Naguib Mahfouz, The Thief and the Dogs
Naguib Mahfouz, Autumn Quail
Hanna Mina, Fragments of Memory: A Story of a Syrian Family (Syria)
Hassan Nasr, Return to Dar al-Basha (Tunisia)
Yusuf al-Qaid, War in the Land of Egypt (Egypt—fictionalization of the era of the 1973 October war, focusing on issues of class exploitation)
Muhsin al-Ramli, Scattered Crumbs (Iraq)
Tayeb Salih, Season of Migration to the North (Sudan)
Tayeb Salih, The Wedding of Zein and Other Stories

Center for African Studies

The Center for African Studies’ Engagement and Outreach Program is designed to increase public knowledge about Africa and to enhance the broader community’s understanding of African peoples and cultures. Our programming serves K-12 schools, community colleges, the media, community groups, the business community, and the general public. For more information, please contact the center at african@illinois.edu .

Resources

Teachers’ Workshop
“Saint in the City: Sufi Arts of Urban Senegal”: Making Curricular Connections to World Cultures, Social Studies, History, Fine Arts, Religion
Nov. 4, 9am-12pm
3 CPDUs
Fine arts and social studies teachers will spend the morning learning about the contemporary visual culture of Senegal—from large popular murals, intricate glass paintings, and calligraphic arts to colorful textiles and paintings and discover ways to connect this material to your curriculum. Space limited and registration required. Please call 217-244-3648 or visit our
website.

Books

Children’s Africana Book Awards. 2006, announced by African Studies Association and Africa Access

Best Book Young Children
Tamara Bower. How the Amazon Queen Fought the Prince of Egypt. Simon & Schuster / Atheneum Books for Young Readers, 2005.

Best Book for Older Readers
Meja Mwangi. The Mzungu Boy. Groundwood Books / House of Anansi Press, 2005

Honor Books Older Readers
David C. Conrad. Empires of Medieval West Africa: Ghana, Mali, and Songhay. Facts on File, 2005

Julius Lester and Jerry Pinkney (illus.). The Old African. Penguin Group (USA) Inc./ Dial Books, 2005

Liz Sonneborn. The Ancient Kushites. Scholastic / Franklin Watts, 2005

Web Resources

HIV/AIDS, Human Rights and Civil Society AUDIO & VIDEO: “Realizing Human Rights: Access to HIV/AIDS-related Medication and the Role of Civil Society in South Africa”
Zackie Achmat, Chairperson, Treatment Action Campaign, South Africa
Zackie Achmat lives with HIV/AIDS. He is an activist with roots in the anti-Apartheid struggle and is at the forefront of campaigns for the rights to health care and medicine. Among his numerous awards, he has received The Nelson Mandela Award for Health and Human Rights, was voted one of 35 heroes of 2003 by Time Magazine, and he along with the TAC was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004. This lecture was delivered at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in March 2006 with the support of the Center for African Studies, the Center for Advanced Studies, and numerous other units.

Pan-Africanism Today AUDIO & VIDEO: “21st-Century Color Lines and Other Lines: The Challenge of Pan-Africanism”
Bill Fletcher, then President and Chief Executive, TransAfrica Forum, Washington DC
As we enter the 21st century, the color line in the global Pan-African movement has certainly not disappeared, but has evolved. Other divisions among the oppressed have complicated notions of transformative strategy for the movement: national liberation struggles hit a strategic dead-end after defeating colonialism and wealth polarization on the planet has raised the issue of class like never before. Race is constantly reconstructed; it is never a permanent category. This lecture was delivered at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in February 2006; it was the Eighth W.E.B. DuBois Lecture organized by the African American Studies and Research Program, the Center for African Studies with the support of the Center for Advanced Studies, and numerous other units.

Africa Access
Helps schools, public libraries, and parents improve the quality of their children’s collections on Africa.

  • Africa Access Review—over 1000 annotations and reviews of books for children.

  • The Children’s Africana Book Awards—established to encourage the publication and use of accurate, balanced children’s books on Africa.

  • Africana Book Buddies Club—providing certificates for young readers.

Eternal Egypt
A rich site!! Start your visit with the “guided tour.” Eternal Egypt illustrating “thousand years of Egyptian civilization. …[it] is a living record of a land rich in art and history, people and places, myths and religions.”

Maps of Africa
Over 570 maps of Africa that date from 1486 to 1922—which help to chronicle European and African encounters! To access and use, turn off your popup-blocker and install Insight’s browsing software, available at the site. These antiquarian maps of Africa are from the collections of the late Dr. Oscar I. Norwich and the Stanford University Libraries.

Southern Africa Freedom Struggles 1950-1994
If you teach about Southern Africa, visit this site! The primary sources provide news reports, images and commentary that will enhance understanding. Teachers and students should be aware these materials represent many different perspectives. “Forty-four periodical titles have been selected from a very comprehensive list, with a view to presenting not only a wide spectrum of political views published during these years, but also a diversity of subjects such as trade unions, religion, health, culture, and gender. Publications reflecting both black and white viewpoints are included, and an attempt has been made to represent distinctive regional variations.”

December 6, 2006

European Union Center

The European Union Center (EUC) serves as a bridge of exchange and understanding between residents of the United States and member states of the European Union (EU). The Center brings together faculty and students from across campus to promote the study of the EU, its institutions and policies, and EU-U.S. relations. Working with other campus units and other institutions, the EUC also creates and delivers high-quality programs that serve Illinois businesses, policy makers, high-school teachers and students, and the general public. As one of the most comprehensive EU Centers in the U.S., the Center is the focal point on campus for teaching, research and outreach programs on the EU. For more information, please contact the center at eucenter@illinois.edu.

Books
Available for check out through EUC library—contact eucenter@illinois.edu

Verhofstadt, Guy. The United States of Europe: Manifesto for a New Europe. London: Federal Trust for Education and Research, 2006.

Paparella, Emanuel De Vanna. A New Europe in Search of its Soul: Essays on the European Union’s Cultural Identity and the Transatlantic Dialogue. Bloomington, Indiana: AuthorHouse, 2005.

Web Resources

EUROPA
This portal site to the European Union includes brief, simple explanations about all facets of the European Union, as well as links to more detailed information.

Europe in 12 Lessons (EUROPA)
A basic introduction to the European Union.

Key Facts and Figures (EUROPA)
Includes information on size, population, candidate countries, work, the economy, education, research, etc. Presents information in colorful charts and graphs.

History (EUROPA)
A brief summary of EU history, plus links to key events in EU history from 1946 to 2005.

Organization of the EU (EUROPA)
A brief introduction to the political organization of the EU. Includes sections on the European Parliament, the Council of the European Union, the European Commission, the Court of Justice, the Court of Auditors, the European Economic and Social Committee, the Committee of the Regions, the European Central Bank, and the European Investment Bank.

Treaties and Laws (EUROPA)
An overview of the treaties on which the political organization of the EU is founded.

Symbols of the EU (EUROPA)
Information on some symbols of the European Union, including the EU flag, the EU anthem, the EU motto and EU Day.

Travel—Communicating (EUROPA)
General information for travelers; includes a section on how to say “good morning” in every official EU language.

Languages in the EU (EUROPA)
Sample written and recorded texts in every official EU language.

CIA World Factbook—European Union
Detailed information on geography, people, government, economy, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues for the European Union as a whole. Also contains links to the same information on individual countries. Includes a map of EU member countries and candidates for membership.

BBC News—Inside Europe
A section of the BBC news Web site devoted especially to European Union news.

Enlarging Europe (BBC News)
Contains information about countries that are candidates for EU membership as well as an interactive map with links to brief summaries and more in-depth country profiles about each candidate country. Also features an animated map showing EU enlargement from 1952 to 2004.

EU Milestones (BBC News)
An interactive timeline of European Union history from 1948 to 2003, including major events and brief summaries.

European Parliament Guide (BBC News)

A short, 7 part guide to the European parliament.

National Geographic World Music Page
Information about artists and musical styles from all over the world. Includes audio files.

European Union Teaching Resources
Curriculum units, EU simulators, Powerpoint materials and other resources suggested by educators.

UCLA—Center for European and Eurasian Studies
Lesson plans on European Union subjects, arranged by topic.

New York Times—Daily Lesson Plans
Lesson plans for grades 6-12 to help educators bring current events into the classroom.

Center for Latin American Caribbean Studies

The Centers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chicago form a US Department of Education National Resource Center consortium to promote Latin American and Caribbean Studies, teacher training, library resources, and expertise in less commonly taught languages throughout the state and beyond. This joint program hosts annual meetings of the Illinois Conference of Latin Americanists, conducts yearly seminars on topics of mutual concern, exchanges faculty and students, shares distinguished visitors and films, and engages in a variety of K-12 activities for schools and the public. The combined resources of the consortium provide one of the largest concentrations of human and material resources on Latin America in the United States. For more information, please contact the center at clacs@illinois.edu .

Books
Américas Award for 2005 Titles Announced

Winner: Cinnamon Girl: letters found inside a cereal box, by Juan Felipe Herrera (New York: HarperCollins; Joanna Cotler Books, 2005), 164 pgs. ISBN 0-06-057984-6.

Honorable Mentions: A Season for Mangoes, by Regina Hanson, illustrations by Eric Velasquez (New York: Clarion, 2005), 32 pgs. ISBN 0-618-15972-X.

The Tequila Worm by Viola Canales (New York: Random House, 2005), 199 pgs. ISBN 0-385-74674-1.

Commended Titles: Julio’s Magic, by Arthur Dorros, illustrated by Ann Grifalconi (New York: HarperCollins, 2005), 32 pgs. ISBN 0-06-029004-8. (For grades K-3).

Lucha Libre: The Man in the Silver Mask, by Xavier Garza, illustrations by Xavier Garza (El Paso: Cinco Puntos, 2005), 40 pgs. ISBN 0-938317-92-X. (For grades 2-6).

Curriculum Units

Art and Identity in Mexico, from the Olmec to Modern Times
Yale-New Havens Teachers Institute, 1999, Volume II.
This curriculum unit consists of seven volumes that range from Maya and Aztec art and culture to new understandings of the works of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. For various grades.

Couriers in the Inca Empire: Getting Your Message Across
EDSITEment.
This lesson will show how the Inca communicated across the vast stretches of their mountain realm, the largest empire of the pre-industrial world. Couriers could pass a message from Quito to Cuzco in 10 days, about the same time as it takes today. For grades 3-5.

Bananas Unpeeled! The Hidden Costs of Banana Production and Trade
The Global Education Network
The theme of banana production and trade is perfectly suited to a curriculum unit intended to help students gain a more global perspective of important world issues. Growing bananas may have devastating effects on the land and workers. For grade 12.

Web Resources

Latin America: Our Neighbors at Home and to the South
Especially designed to assist fifth-grade instructors in teaching about Latin America, this 10-week topical unit includes lesson plans and activities. In Population Data Activity, students analyze numerical data about countries; and in Guatemalan Market Place, Three Regions of Latin America, and Newspaper Lessons, the goal is to promote multicultural awareness and an appreciation for diversity.

Complete Curriculum Units
The Center for Latin American Studies at the University of Arizona developed a variety of information, activities, lessons and ideas that can be used directly or adapted to teach about Latin America in many learning environments. Topics include Global Market from and to the Americas, Mariachi Mania, and Day of the Dead.

BBC
BBC News has useful resources such as country profiles and a timeline that includes a chronology of key events in Latin America. You can also listen to national anthems and read the latest news on the region. Also, BBC’s World Service features Latin American Words, a special series with exclusive interviews with authors, academics and critics from across Latin America.

Videos

Looking for Victoria: An Argentine Story
By Ton Vriens. 58 min.
Victoria, a young Argentine woman, set out to find the truth about her parents who disappeared in 1978 during the military dictatorship. With Argentina on the brink of social chaos today, Victoria finds herself facing the same difficult choices her parents had to make: to emigrate, or stay and fight for change.

The Gas Is Not For Sale (El Gas, No Se Vende) By Tercer Mundo Labor Video Group of Bolivia. 26 min.
On October 2003 a national rebellion took place against the government of Sanchez de Lozada. His plan to privatize the gas was met with mass resistance. He used the U.S. supplied army against the people, and over 80 died and hundreds were wounded. This video shows the rebellion from the ground floor.

Spirits of the Rainforest
By Discovery Communications. 90 min.
Journey 3000 miles from the mouth of the Amazon to the world’s largest rainforest preserve, the Manu Biosphere Reserve in Peru. Encounter six-foot river otters, boat uncharted rivers, and experience the myths and magic of the Machiguenga Indians.

Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies

The Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies (EAPS) is the steward of campus-wide teaching, research, programming, and outreach on East Asia, as well as Southeast Asia and the Pacific. EAPS is currently a National Undergraduate Resource Center devoted to the enhancement of campus undergraduate teaching and learning on East Asia and to outreach programming on East Asia for educators, the public, and media and business professionals. EAPS serves over 100 specialists on East Asia, as well as more than 30 off-campus affiliates across the state. For more information, contact Anne Prescott at aprescot@illinois.edu .

Web Resources

There are many Web resources for teachers with downloadable lesson plans, teaching guides, searchable databases, primary documents, games for students, professional development opportunities, and much more. But how do you know where to begin? Here are a few tried-and-true Web sites, used almost daily by the EAPS staff, where you can begin your search for materials on Asia. Most also offer links to other, more specialized recommended Web sites.

Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS)
AEMS is an EAPS program whose mission is to promote understanding of Asian cultures and peoples and to assist teachers at all levels, from elementary schools to colleges and universities, and other individuals and groups, in learning and teaching about Asia.

AEMS offers help in locating audio-visual media resources about Asia and advice in choosing among the many resources available. Their international panels of experts review newly-released materials, and evaluate them for content, accuracy, appeal, and educational usefulness.

AEMS publishes a free newsletter and has videos and print guides available for purchase. Also, AEMS conducts workshops and organizes exhibits at an array of conferences related to Asian studies and social studies education. In addition, AEMS provides a collection of high-quality media and curriculum materials available in their local resource library.

Asia for Educators
Asia for Educators is a resource site for teachers developed by Columbia University’s East Asian Curriculum Project (EACP), a national initiative devoted to supporting education on Asia at the secondary and elementary levels. Focusing primarily on China and Japan, the site features teaching units, lesson plans, primary-source readings, resource lists, bibliographies, Web courses, a searchable database, and more.

AskAsia
AskAsia is the Asia Society’s online clearinghouse for K-12 Asian and Asian American studies. Teachers will find lesson plans, maps, images, and professional development opportunities; students can explore an interactive tour of Shanghai and more, and kids of all ages can try their hands at language games. AskAsia can answer nearly all your questions about Asia—or direct you to someone who can.

Forum on Asia in the Curriculum
A Columbia University project, this bulletin board serves as a clearinghouse for announcements of professional development opportunities, conferences, grants and prizes, and other events of interest to educators at all levels. Anyone can read the postings, and a simple registration process allows participants to post their own announcements or queries. This is the place to go if you want advice from your colleagues, notices of events in your area, or if you’re simply curious about other educators’ activities. The Forum on Asia in the Curriculum is jointly supported by: the ASIANetwork; the Committee on Teaching about Asia (CTA) of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS); the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA); the Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP); the Council of Conferences (COC)of the Association for Asian Studies (AAS); and the Association of Teachers of Japanese (ATJ).

The Digital Classroom at NARA (National Archives and Records Administration)
This site features primary-sources documents, classroom activities, and information on professional development for educators. To encourage teachers of students at all levels to use archival documents in the classroom, the Digital Classroom provides materials from the National Archives and methods for teaching with primary sources.

Education About Asia (EAA) Magazine
Now in its eleventh year, Education About Asia is designed to be a tool for K-16 teachers who wish to bring information on Asia to their classrooms. EAA features articles on all areas of Asia, with subjects ranging from ancient cultures and literature to current events; extensive guides to resources for use in the classroom, including films, books, videos, curriculum guides, Web sites, software, and other useful educational tools; plus thematic issues on topics of particular interest. Highly recommended for lesson plans and background information that is useful across disciplines and grade levels.

National Clearinghouse for US-Japan Studies
This Web site showcases a variety of services and products for elementary and secondary educators interested in teaching and learning about Japanese culture as well as U.S.-Japan relations. It features a database that includes information on print materials, videos, artifact kits, software, and teacher-developed materials. Japan Digests, concise reports on a number of topics of interest to teachers specifically developed for the Clearinghouse, may be downloaded from the Web site.

February 16, 2007

Global Engagement

Introduction To Global Engagement

This section of the publication is devoted to providing information and resources specifically designed for our K-16 readership and their curricular needs. You’ll find narratives on thematic topics, resource lists, and calendars of events for the University of Illinois’ area studies centers. Should you have any questions or require additional information, please feel to contact the appropriate center.

Center for African Studies
Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies
European Union Center
Center for Global Studies
Center for International Business Education and Research
Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center
Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies


CENTER FOR AFRICAN STUDIES
The Center for African Studies’ Engagement and Outreach Program is designed to increase public knowledge about Africa and to enhance the broader community’s understanding of African peoples and cultures. Our programming serves K-12 schools, community colleges, the media, community groups, the business community, and the general public. For more information, please contact the center.

Teaching African Literature
Keguro Macharia, Ph.D. Candidate
Department of English

Teachers of African literature are often called on to do the impossible: to teach a narrow selection of works that somehow represent a vast continent full of diverse languages, multiple histories, and widely differing customs and traditions. What, for example, binds Liberia and Eritrea or for that matter Mauritania and Botswana? What link can be made between Chinua Achebe’s 1958 Things Fall Apart and J.M. Coetzee’s 1999 Disgrace?

Even though I have been reading African fiction for as long as I can remember, my academic work thus far has been heavily Americanist. This semester, I broke out of the Americanist mold to teach a class called Modern African Fiction. As the semester ends, I am still trying to answer one main question: what is this thing called “African literature” and can it be taught?
In short, I have no great thesis about African literature, no profound insights about teaching it, simply notes from the trenches.

Most critics will agree that most modern African literature is deeply bound to the history of its production. The literature reflects on the social, political, and cultural changes of a restless continent. My overarching frame is that African literature considers the continual conflict between tradition and the modern. I take formal European colonialism as the main rupture point between tradition and modernity. Consequently, I structure my class around the effects of colonialism in novels such as Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s The River Between, and Mariama Bâ’s So Long a Letter.

I teach colonialism by considering three related aspects: the impact of Christianity, the importance of formal European education, and the role of urbanization. For example, in The River Between, the novel’s central conflict takes place between the new converts to Christianity and adherents to traditional belief. The novel allows us to consider the role of religion in shaping political and social identities.

Second, I consider the impact of formal European education. Teachers and students are important, recurring figures in African fiction, be it the village teacher in The River Between or the professor in Disgrace. Education, like Christianity, is central to how characters understand their social and political identities. For instance, The River Between offers two models of education, one based on learning traditional rites and “secrets,” the other based on formal strategies of reading and writing. In Bâ’s novel, for example, the female narrator muses on how education provides new opportunities for West African women to re-shape their social roles.

Finally, I consider the role of urbanization in African fiction and its effects on social structures. I ask my students to consider how the urban impacts notions of family, forcing individual characters to break or modify ties with extended family members and to create new social bonds with strangers. For example, we consider how traditional notions of gift-giving during important ceremonies have been affected: instead of giving material items, characters give money. Focusing on urban spaces also allows us to consider the conflict between the urban poor and elites that is central to many novels.

Because many of these concepts can seem very abstract, I try to ground each class by considering how the novels we read examine the concept of family. By mapping how family structures are affected by religion, education, and urbanization, we can begin to understand how these concepts affect ordinary lives.

Beyond some of the commonly taught African novels, Keguro Macharia recommends K-12 teachers consider the following options:

The Concubine, Elechi Amadi.
Purple Hibiscus, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.
Nervous Conditions, Tsitsi Dangarembga.

All of these are in print and available in the United States. Also, they’ve received quite a bit of scholarly attention, so there are several resources available for K-12 teachers.
To learn about more novels on Africa that are highly regarded and aimed at various levels of readers, please visit Africa Access Review and check out the Children’s Africana Book Awards.


CENTER FOR EAST ASIAN AND PACIFIC STUDIES
The Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies (EAPS) is the steward of campus-wide teaching, research, programming, and outreach on East Asia, as well as Southeast Asia and the Pacific. EAPS is currently a National Undergraduate Resource Center devoted to the enhancement of campus undergraduate teaching and learning on East Asia and to outreach programming on East Asia for educators, the public, and media and business professionals. EAPS serves over 100 specialists on East Asia, as well as more than 30 off-campus affiliates across the state. For more information, contact Anne Prescott.

Anne Prescott, Associate Director, EAPS

The Lunar New Year, which is celebrated throughout East Asia, begins on February 18, 2007. The traditions of this time of celebration are all told in folk tales, and are a good way to learn about East Asian cultures in general. It is important to know that this festival is celebrated not only in China, but in other parts of Asia as well, and Asian-Americans prefer to refer to it as the Lunar New Year rather than Chinese New Year. But many of the traditions associated with this holiday originated in China, and many children’s books describe the Lunar New Year from a Chinese or Chinese-American perspective.

In China and other countries which follow or traditionally followed the lunar calendar, each year is associated with one of 12 animals in the Chinese zodiac, and 2007 is the year of the pig. Many people know about the Chinese zodiac from placemats commonly found at Chinese restaurants. But which animals are a part of the Chinese zodiac? And how were they chosen?
The basic story line is that the Emperor challenged all of the animals to a race through the countryside, and the first 12 animals to arrive were given a year in the zodiac. Everyone expected the cat, seemingly the swiftest of the animals, to win. But there’s a twist in this tale, and the cat arrives too late and misses out on a place in the zodiac cycle. The story of the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac can be found in a number of delightfully-illustrated books for children.

The following is a list of children’s books which tell this story or describe other Lunar New Year traditions.

China
Story of the Chinese Zodiac: English Chinese by Monica Chang, Yuan-Liou Publishing Company, 1994. In this book, the story is told in both Chinese and English, and it could be used in a classroom or at a library with children who speak both languages. It is also available in English-Korean, English-Thai, English-Tagalog and English-Vietnamese versions.

Cat and Rat: The Legend of the Chinese Zodiac by Ed Young (Illustrator) Henry Holt and Co., 1998. This is another much-loved version of this story for young children.

For more information on Chinese Lunar New Year traditions, visit Chinese New Year.

Japan
In Japanese, the New Year’s festival is called “oshôgatsu.”

Japanese Celebrations: Cherry Blossoms, Lanterns And Stars! by Betty Reynolds, Tuttle Publishing, 2006.

How the Years Were Named-kamishibai (kah-mee-she-bye). Chizuko Kamichi, author, Yuko Kanazawa, illustrator, available from www.kamishibai.com.

Kamishibai (literally “paper theater”) is a traditional Japanese storytelling method featuring illustrated cards which the storyteller narrates. Today, kamishibai used in schools and libraries have the dialogue, which is realized by the storyteller, printed on the back of the cards. Kamishibai are a great hit in schools in both Japan and the US.

For more information, please visit Japan-Guide.

Korea
In Korean, the New Year’s celebration is called “seol.”

This Next New Year by Janet S. Wong, Yangsook Choi (Illustrator), Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR), 2000

Tales of a Korean Grandmother, by Frances Carpenter, Tuttle Publishing, 1973. This book includes many references to Korean New Year traditions.

For more information on seol, visit ClickAsia.

Vietnam
In Vietnamese, the Lunar New Year is called “tet.”

Tet: Vietnamese New Year by Dianne M. MacMillan, Enslow Elementary, 1994.

Ten Mice for Tet! by Pegi Deitz Shea, Cynthia Weill, To Ngoc Trang (Illustrator), Chronicle Books, 2003.

Want to learn more about tet? Visit Tet the Vietnamese New Year.


EUROPEAN UNION CENTER
The European Union Center (EUC) serves as a bridge of exchange and understanding between residents of the United States and member states of the European Union (EU). The Center brings together faculty and students from across campus to promote the study of the EU, its institutions and policies, and EU-U.S. relations. Working with other campus units and other institutions, the EUC also creates and delivers high-quality programs that serve Illinois businesses, policy makers, high-school teachers and students, and the general public. As one of the most comprehensive EU Centers in the U.S., the Center is the focal point on campus for teaching, research and outreach programs on the EU. For more information, please contact the center.

Scandinavia and the U.S.
Anna W. Stenport and Helena M. Hall, The Scandinavian Program, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures

The Scandinavian countries, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, located in the very northern part of Europe, are in some respects quite similar to contemporary U.S. A high standard of living; an educated population; and a generally Western lifestyle, including advanced use of technology (Internet, cell phones, etc.) are a few key similarities. In the U.S. today, Scandinavia is perhaps best recognized by corporate names, such as IKEA, Ericsson, Volvo, and H&M. During the nineteenth-century, many Scandinavians emigrated to the United States. In 1900, Chicago had the second-largest population of Swedes in the world, after Stockholm, the capital of Sweden.

The three Scandinavian countries share many characteristics of the European Welfare State—a high tax-base provides low-cost health care, daycare, care for the elderly, and free education from kindergarten to graduate school, while it also offers generous unemployment, sick and parental leave. The three countries generally pride themselves on the achievements of the Welfare State and cherish the low rates of poverty and high rates of education, including strict standards of environmental control and policies that promote egalitarianism across social classes and gender equality. The languages spoken in the three countries, Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish, are mutually intelligible, although almost every adult speaks fluent English. Both Sweden and Denmark are members of the European Union.

A large portion of Sweden’s and Denmark’s population was born abroad, which has transformed these countries into multi-ethnic communities over the last two decades. This transition has, however, not been easy, and the two countries are struggling with racism and discrimination, particularly in the employment sector.

Incorporating aspects of Scandinavian history and contemporary culture in the K-12 curriculum provides exciting opportunities to learn about a region in the world that is both familiar and different. Astrid Lindgren’s illustrated Pippi Longstocking presents a portrait of an independent child, the strongest girl in the world, who lives alone and does mostly as she pleases. The book, suitable for K-1, gives a sense of how Swedes like to think about child-rearing—as a way to promote creativity, independence, and resourcefulness. Ulrika Jondelius, Svea’s Sweden, a recently published children’s book, offers a contemporary introduction to Swedish culture from a child’s perspective. In 1906, Selma Lagerlöf, one of Sweden’s most cherished authors, wrote The Wonderful Adventures of Nils, a geography textbook about a boy traveling around Sweden on the back of a farm goose. Her innovative approach to learning geography can still be enjoyed in elementary and middle school classrooms today.

The Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen provide insight into nineteenth-century Danish culture, and particularly its understanding of Lutheranism. Reading Andersen’s The Little Mermaid (1836) and comparing the fairy-tale ending (Ariel seeks an eternal soul) with the Disney film version (Ariel seeks to marry the Prince) offer interesting perspectives on cultural transfer, which is suitable for grade school students to discuss and analyze. The Norwegian playwright Henrik Ibsen influenced modern drama and the women’s independence movement all around the world. His most famous play, A Doll’s House (1879), still inspires discussion about the function of family, motherhood, and gender relations, topics appropriate for junior high school students.

For high school students interested in learning about contemporary Scandinavian multi-ethnic culture, Christopher Caldwell’s “Islam on the Outskirts of the Welfare State” (New York Times Magazine 02/05/2006) gives an excellent introduction. Henning Mankell’s detective novel Faceless Killers (1991) addresses issues of immigration control and racism, as understood by Sweden’s best-known crime writer. The Norwegian film Insomnia (1997) was remade in Hollywood with the same title in 2002; comparing the characters, landscape, and resolution of the crime story offers students insights into the culture and customs of northern Norway.

Unless otherwise noted, the material discussed above is available at amazon
.com or blockbuster.com. For more info, please contact Anna W. Stenport.

The Wonderful Adventures of Nils (Paperback) by Selma Lagerlof.

Do You Know Pippi Longstocking? (Paperback) by Astrid Lindgren.

A Doll’s House (Paperback) by Henrik Ibsen.

The Little Mermaid (Hardcover) by Hans Christian Andersen.

The Little Mermaid (USA, 1989) Animated film directed by Ron Clements

Faceless Killers (Paperback) by Henning Mankell.

Insomnia (Norway, 1997)Film directed by Erik Skjoldberg.

Insomnia (USA, 2002)Film directed by Christopher Nolan.

CENTER FOR GLOBAL STUDIES
The Center for Global Studies (CGS) is a National Resource Center for the study of globalization under the Title VI program of the Department of Education. CGS has a four-fold mission: 1) to promote and support research to identify the impacts of globalization on the world’s populations and states and to develop strategies to address global issues; 2) to globalize UI across its nine colleges and multiple disciplinary and professional units; 3) to make teaching programs related to global studies available to K-16 students and teachers in Illinois and around the country as well as to businesses, professional and civic organizations, media, governmental agencies, and all members of the interested public; and 4). through its FLAS Fellowships and Title VI grant, support the acquisition of advanced language skills and understanding of other cultures for UI students. For more information, please contact the center.

Lynn Rudasill
Librarian, Center for Global Studies

Providing materials for K-12 students on the topic of global studies and globalization is essential to help them understand the interconnected aspects of the world in which we live. A few wonderful resources exist in the library in print and online. We have provided a few suggestions for your consideration here. You can look for more resources in most online catalogs by doing a subject search. Suggested search terms include globalization—juvenile literature, globalization and teaching, globalization—social aspects, multicultural education—activity programs, international education—case studies, globalization—history, international education, international education—handbooks, manuals, etc., and international education—activity programs. Search the I-Share catalog for the State of Illinois or try the links from the Center for Global Studies .
A few selected books on globalization are listed below:

Globalization by Iris Teichmann (Smart Apple Media, 2004) is targeted at elementary and junior high school students. It attempts to define globalization, the rise of multi-national corporations and global debt, and the ethical and economic questions surrounding these topics at an understandable level for these age groups.

Globalize It!: The Stories of the IMF, the World Bank, the WTO, and Those Who Protest by Brendan January (Twenty-First Century Books, 2003) targets upper level elementary and junior high school students. The book begins with a description of the “Battle of Seattle” in 1999 and proceeds to present arguments from both anti-globalization activists and pro-globalization enthusiasts that cover the history and missions of the organizations in the title, as well as the influence of companies like Nike and individuals like Michael Jordan, in presenting a somewhat simplified view of the process of globalization.

Travel the Globe: Multicultural Story Times by Desiree Webber (Libraries Unlimited, 1998) provides the reader with a wide variety of resources targeting the younger learner. The work includes resources for storytelling, music, lists of books to read aloud, finger plays, and crafts and activities that take the students on a trip around the world. The countries visited in this book include Australia, Brazil, the Caribbean Islands, China, Russia, Egypt, Ghana, Greece, India, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Vietnam, and the United States’ Native Americans. An author/title index and an index of activities provide excellent access to the materials found between its covers.

Global Winners: 74 Learning Activities for Inside and Outside the Classroom by Jan Drum, Steve Hughes and George G. Otero (Intercultural Press, 1994) is another excellent resource for international education. This work is also available electronically if your library purchases books from ebrary publishing.

Development, globalization and sustainability by John Morgan (Nelson Thornes, 2001) discusses the concepts of economic development and sustainability within globalization from a non-US viewpoint. Part of this work is dedicated to a broad overview of development in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Southeast Asia. The author chooses one country from each of these regions for more in-depth treatment as well.

The Global Community, 1975–2000 by Pier Paolo Poggio, Carlo Simoni, and Giogio Bacchin (Chelsea House Publishers, 2003) explores how industrialization since 1968, especially in communication and information science, has transformed economic, political, and social structures. The effects of this transformation on developed and underdeveloped areas are discussed. The target audience for this work is high school students.

Don’t forget there are some useful materials on the World Wide Web including foreign newspapers, such as those translated on WatchingAmerica.com, and geographic tools, such as Google Earth, that can be used to enrich the learning environment.


CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS EDUCATION AND RESEARCH
The Illinois Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), one of 31 national resource centers for international business, is a leader in designing and delivering programs that equip future business leaders with language skills, cultural awareness, and the specific business skills needed to be at the vanguard of international business management. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Illinois CIBER coordinates seminars and workshops for professional audiences, funds faculty research on international competitiveness, underwrites development and delivery of new business foreign language courses, develops and sponsors overseas experiences for undergraduate and graduate students, supports an annual international business case competition, serves as a resource for the business community through its website, conferences, and consulting, and administers the Certificate in Global Business Culture with Area Specialization. For more information, please contact the center or visit the Web site.


THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN STUDIES
The Centers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chicago form a U.S. Department of Education National Resource Center consortium to promote Latin American and Caribbean Studies, teacher training, library resources, and expertise in less commonly taught languages throughout the state and beyond. This joint program hosts annual meetings of the Illinois Conference of Latin Americanists, conducts yearly seminars on topics of mutual concern, exchanges faculty and students, shares distinguished visitors and films, and engages in a variety of K-12 activities for schools and the public. The combined resources of the consortium provide one of the largest concentrations of human and material resources on Latin America in the United States. For more information, please contact the center.

Representing and Misrepresenting Brazil: Violence in Movies
Antonio Luciano Tosta, Assistant Professor of Brazilian Literature & Culture, Department of Spanish, Italian & Portuguese

On December 1st, 2006 John Stockwell’s thriller Turistas, the story of a group of US teenage “tourists” who go to Brazil on vacation, was released nationally. Although Rio de Janeiro is known as the “Wonderful City,” the travelers in Stockwell’s drama are in for dreadful surprises. After a deceiving “sex, drugs, and Samba” welcome, the youngsters wind up stranded in a village, where they realize that their documents and money have been stolen. They later face torture and are persecuted by organ brokers who want to sell their body parts in the black market. The movie trailer highlights that Brazil “looks like Paradise” and is “a country where anything goes.” This stereotypical portrayal, which includes the movie’s appeal to violence, has caused a commotion among Brazilians everywhere.

The passion that has characterized discussions about Turistas is partly because global organ trafficking has been associated with Brazil. As much as one might argue that the black market organ trade is an urban legend, the theme has been brought up in at least two contemporary Brazilian films. Central Station, directed by Walter Salles, portrayed the saga of a young boy who is sold to, and subsequently rescued from, organ snatchers. Sérgio Bianchi’s Chronically Unfeasible also portrays an organ trafficking business disguised as an adoption company. Both films hit Brazil vehemently when they were released, especially because they make explicit social criticism, and incorporate echoes of the “aesthetics of violence” that characterized Brazilian Cinema Novo movement in the sixties. Influenced by Italian neo-realism, directors such as Glauber Rocha and Cacá Diegues, created an intellectual and aesthetic movement whose agenda focused on the discussion of national reality, bringing to light social and political inequality at a time when Brazil experienced a fierce dictatorship.

Although the Cinema Novo productions differ from these recent films, as in the explicit rejection of Hollywood-like cinematography, many of the latter share with the former a commitment to causing social impact by making overt criticism in a documentary manner. Violence is used to highlight oppression and exclusion, as it is portrayed as the outcome of failed economic and judicial governmental policies. Moreover, these films aim at revealing Brazil to its people. That is why Turistas cannot, in fact, be compared with most Brazilian films that explore the theme of violence. Brazilians’ disapproving reaction to Stockwell’s film, therefore, is more than a rejection of an imperialistic look at a third-world society. Turistas tells nothing but the story of a “Spring Break vacation gone really badly.” It generates no reflection on Brazil. Therefore, Turistas misrepresents, or rather, does not represent Brazil whatsoever.

Central Station was the first film in the 1990s that achieved international reputation and connected Brazil to corruption and violence. But Fernando Meirelles and Katia Lund’s City of God is the best-known representative of the genre. Resembling gangster and US Western films, it depicts not only the structure of the drug traffic and power disputes among drug lords in a Rio shantytown, but also police corruption, class differences, and social and spatial exclusion. Violence is also a major theme in Invasor, Carandiru, O Homem do Ano, Lower City, Notícias de uma Guerra Particular, and Ônibus 174. Although Brazilian films are also exploring other themes, such as the depiction of colonial and political history, violence still predominates. This choice of representation is incomplete, but valid because violence is a reality in most urban areas and needs to be addressed so that the population can continue to debate its causes and possible solutions.


RUSSIA, EAST EUROPEAN AND EURASIAN CENTER
The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center is a U.S. Department of Education-designated National Resource Center, committed to providing information and service to K-16 teachers. If you are interested in the Center’s workshops, onsite presentations, or curricular materials, please contact the center or check visit the REEEC Web site. The Web site features a special section for K-12 teachers under Outreach, which includes an extensive annotated bibliography of resources, information on the Center’s multimedia lending library, annotated links to relevant web sites, and more.

Resources for Teaching Russian, East European, and Eurasian Children’s Stories
The following is a bibliography of Russian, East European and Eurasian folk tales and picture books for a preschool through middle school audience. These books were selected and annotated by Colleen Galvin, University of Illinois Masters Student in Library and Information Science and REEEC Outreach Assistant.

Tales Told in Tents: Stories from Central Asia by Sally Pomme Clayton. Frances Lincoln, 2005. Elementary and up. This rich compilation includes stories, poems, riddles and proverbs from Central Asia. Colorful illustrations. Map and small glossary included.

Brundibar by Tony Kushner. Illustrated by Maurice Sendak. Michael Di Capua Books, 2003. Elementary and up. When Aninku and Pipicek try to get milk for their sick mother, they are thwarted by the town bully Brunibar. The story is based on an opera that was performed fifty-five times by the children of Terezin, the Nazi concentration camp located in what is now the Czech Republic. The story itself works for younger audiences, but the context of the tale makes it a good aide for teaching about the Holocaust to all ages.

Silly Horse by Vadim Levin. Translated from Russian by Tanya Wolfson and Tatiana Zunshine; Illustrated by Evgeny Antonenkov. Pumpkin House, 2005. Pre-school and up. Russian poet Vadim Levin wrote this collection of humorous poems in 1969 and they have been influential in Russian culture ever since.

Silly Horse by Marianna Mayer. Illustrated by K. Y. Craft. Morrow Junior Books, 1994. Elementary and up. With the help of her doll, young Vasilisa gets the better of the evil witch Baba Yaga. This retelling of the Russian Cinderella is filled with beautiful, eerie illustrations.

The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco. Aladdin Picture Books, 1988. Elementary and up. The history of the Russian-Jewish immigrant experience made accessible through the tale one family, their traditions, and the quilt they make. Polacco’s distinctive illustrations are in black and white, with the fabrics of the quilt in color.

The Love for Three Oranges by Sergei Prokofiev. Illustrated by Elzbieta Gaudasinska. Pumpkin House, 2006. Elementary and up. Adapted from the opera by Prokofiev, the story is a “combination of humor, sorrow, fantasy and grotesquery. And of course it’s a tale of love for three very large oranges.” (book flap). The unique, pastel illustrations complement the text.

Little Daughter of the Snow by Arthur Ransome. Edited by Shena Guild. Illustrated by Tom Bower. Frances Lincoln, 2005. Pre-school and up. The traditional Russian fairy tale about an elderly couple who long for their own child. They create a snow girl, who comes alive and agrees to stay with them as long as they love her. The folk-style illustrations bring to mind the old Russian countryside.

The Golden Mare, the Firebird, and the Magic Ring by Ruth Sanderson. Little, Brown Young Readers (2001). Elementary and up. Sanderson combines elements from several Russian fairy tales to create a compelling story about one young man’s quest. The large, beautiful illustrations make this a good read-aloud book for young readers as well.

The Sea King’s Daughter: A Russian Legend by Aaron Shepard. Illustrated by Gennady Spirin. Atheneum, 1997, Elementary and up. The poor musician Sadko must choose between the Sea King’s daughter and his beloved home, Novgorod. A sophisticated retelling of the traditional Russian folk tale, Gennady Spirin’s illustrations evoke old Russia and the mysterious sea underworld. A history of the story and pronunciation guide is also included.

A Little Story about a Big Turnip by Tatiana Zunshine. Illustrated by Evgeny Antonenkov. Pumpkin House, 2004. Pre-school and up. This traditional Russian folk tale is retold by Russian-born author Tatiana Zunshine. Filled with silly illustrations and simple sentences, it is perfect for younger audiences.


PROGRAM IN SOUTH ASIAN AND MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES
The Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (PSAMES) has just become a National Resource Center for the study and teaching of the Middle East, with a Title VI grant from the Department of Education. PSAMES promotes research and teaching on two regions that, together, comprise one-fifth of humanity and are home to five of the world’s major religions and its earliest civilizations. The program regularly organizes lectures, cultural events, symposia, and conferences concerning current events, political cultures and societies of the Middle East and South Asia, and research on Muslim communities worldwide. PSAMES faculty members have led summer abroad programs in Egypt and India in recent years and the program supports the graduate level study of Middle Eastern languages with Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. PSAMES is committed to fostering outreach activities for K-12 and the community. For more information, please contact the center or visit the PSAMES Web site.

Marilyn Booth
Director, PSAMES

Books for young children on the Arab Middle East are increasingly visible in juvenile publishing. Fiction about Arab children, picture books portraying Arab societies, and reworked, translated literary texts introduce young students to a region they may catch disturbing glimpses of on television news.

I write as a center director committed to furthering knowledge of the Middle East among learners of all ages and as a mother and educator for whom the region has been central, both professionally and personally, shaping my own learning since age eleven. Here, I suggest a few titles that introduce the Middle East, especially Egypt, to K-6 students. I write from personal experience, and with limitations: this is only a sample and not entirely up-to-date. I offer it as material that I know to be accurate, well communicated, and lively. All titles below are aimed at K-6 audiences and are generally not more than 48 pages.

Everyone “knows” ancient Egypt; there exists copious material on the society of the Pharaohs for elementary students. But what about modern Egypt? Medieval Egypt? What about Egypt’s role in world histories? Books that narrate material histories—of certain products or practices—with an Egypt-centered focus allow students to consider how familiar presences are parts of other people’s histories, too. Vivienne Davis’s The World of Bread and The World of Coffee (Cairo: Elias-Hoopoe, 1993) offer world histories but with some Egypt-centered content. Sports also bring distant worlds closer: in his Focus on Football, Focus on Swimming, and Focus on Tennis (Cairo: Elias-Hoopoe, 1992), Jeremy Taylor gives young (K-3) readers a world tour of sport with details on Egyptian sports figures and events. Published for young readers in Egypt, to read these to young bread-eaters and swimmers in the United States “decenters” US perspectives.

Books that portray rituals and material culture fill out these new perspectives. Two books my children loved remain fine presentations with good photography: Olivia Bennett, Village in Egypt (London: A&C Black, 1983) follows daily activities, while Preben Kristensen and Fiona Cameron, We Live in Egypt (Hove, U.K.: Wayland, 1986), features first-person narratives from a variety of Egyptians—a camel dealer, a civil engineer, a bellydancer, a riverboat captain. In Festivals of Egypt (Cairo: Hoopoe, 1995), Jailan Abbas explains Muslim and Christian holiday rituals and Nile festivals inherited from the Pharaohs.

Offering historical narratives to young readers, Denys Johnson-Davies has written on early Islamic history for a slightly older audience (3rd–8th grades) in The Battles of the Prophet Muhammad and Stories of the Caliphs: The Early Rulers of Islam (Cairo: Elias-Hoopoe, 1997). A biography series, “Heroes from the East” (Cambridge, U.K.: Hood Hood Books www.hoodhood.com), offers portraits of (among others) Razia, Warrior Queen of India, the seventeenth-century Ottoman Turkish architect Sinan, and Mehmet the Conqueror. Abd al-Rahman Azzam narrates travel adventures of a great 14th-century Moroccan voyager and travel writer in The Travels of Ibn Battuta, Ibn Battuta in the Valley of Doom, Ibn Battuta Son of the Mighty Eagle, Ibn Battuta and the Lost Shadow, and Ibn Battuta and the Tatar Princess (Cambridge, UK: Hood Hood).

What about the marvelous story telling for which Arab societies are renowned? Denys Johnson-Davies presents a range of folk tales and 1001 Nights stories in a series published in Cairo in the mid-1990s by Elias-Hoopoe: Stories from the Arab Past, Animal Tales from the Arab World, Tales from Morocco, Aladdin and the Lamp, Tales from Sudan, Maarouf and the Dream Caravan, The Voyages of Sindbad, Goha (a beloved, bumbling folk figure), and Folk Tales of Egypt. Moving away from North Africa, look also for an outstanding rendition of a Palestinian story that blends childhood experience and fairy-tale lore by Sally Bahous, Sitti and the Cats: A Tale of Friendship (Niwot, Colorado: Roberts Rinehart Publishers, 1993).

Florence Parry Heide and Judith Heide Gilliland have written two wonderful story books, beautifully illustrated by Ted Lewin. The Day of Ahmed’s Secret (New York: Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Books, 1992) follows a young, working-class boy, the story’s narrator, as he works his way—literally—through Cairo’s streets, preserving a secret that he eventually tells his family. Sami and the Time of the Troubles (Clarion Books, 1992) is narrated by young Sami, a Beirut boy during Lebanon’s civil war, living in a basement with his mother. War isn’t lyrical, but Sami’s story is.

May 29, 2007

Resources for K–16 Educators: Transnational Popular Culture Industries

This section of the publication is devoted to providing information and resources specifically designed for our K-16 readership and their curricular needs. You’ll find narratives on thematic topics, resource lists, and calendars of events for the University of Illinois’ area studies centers. Should you have any questions or require additional information, please feel free to contact the appropriate center.


Center for African Studies
Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies
European Union Center
Center for Global Studies
Center for International Business Education and Research
Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center
Other Studies Centers

Center for African Studies
The Center for African Studies’ Engagement and Outreach Program is designed to increase public knowledge about Africa and to enhance the broader community’s understanding of African peoples and cultures. Our programming serves K-12 schools, community colleges, the media, community groups, the business community, and the general public. For more information, please contact the center.

Africa and Transnational Cultural Industries
Tony Perman
Ph.D. Candidate, School of Music

It could be argued that the world grows smaller and more mobile every year. The media and academics constantly tout the praises of, or warn the world about, globalization’s perceived pros and cons, agreeing only that we are global now, for better or worse. Of course this is debatable; descriptions of “the global” tend to forget about much of the world, relegating rural areas in the poorer countries of Africa and central Asia to the margins. Perhaps more than anything, it is the human-made things that are more mobile. As communications, transportation, and commerce expand, transnational culture industries—those spaces in which the objects of culture such as music, film, art, clothing, and food are bought, sold, transported, and circulated—emerge as increasingly important players in the world’s economies and for people’s identities. Online you can buy Zimbabwean mbira music and Palestinian embroidery while eating pad thai. Rural Zimbabwean teens gather around a computer wearing Tupac Shakur shirts, watching Jamaican ragga videos while drinking Coke.

The transnational culture industries do their best to capitalize on people’s efforts to turn their cultures into commodities, but this is hardly new. Perhaps the only aspect of this process that is truly indicative of the 21st century is its speed. African music, dance, and art have long been a source of influence and inspiration worldwide. Congolese and Cuban musicians listened to each other for decades, but instead of their music moving with the sailors on ships, it travels as files on the internet. Increasingly, a commercial infrastructure has arisen that markets African cultural products beyond Africa. After Bob Marley’s success in the 70s, European and U.S. record companies sought the next superstar, capitalizing on the supposedly unique and authentic combination of revolutionary politics, spiritual connection, and pre-colonial roots sound to market musicians such as Thomas Mapfumo, Youssou N’Dour, Sunny Ade, and others. Sculptures from Zimbabwe and Nigeria are commonly found in the wealthy world’s high art galleries. European and African artists have long recognized the possibilities in one another’s work, but increasingly can bring their work with them as they market themselves to an ever-expanding art community.

Cultural commerce goes in both directions. Industries outside of Africa recognize the audiences and markets available, pushing the movies and music of Hollywood and the Billboard charts to Africa’s cosmopolitan youth. Hip-hop, R&B, action, and Kung Fu are important influences in African artistic production. This complex web of powerful producers, struggling artists, savvy marketers, and excited audiences brings people closer together than is often imagined.

These industries are not necessarily benign. Certain markets, such as the U.S., are much wealthier and more powerful than most others. Companies such as McDonald’s and Coke inspire their own vocabularies as fears of the “McDonaldization” of the world increase. Well-meaning commentators worry that the spread of Hollywood movies and Madison Avenue ideals will wear down local cultures around the world. There’s also fear that the world’s diversity of expressions will fade away in deference to the growing control of American capitalism and the resulting cultural homogenization. While the dangers of these processes may be very real, there is no way to predict how communities will respond to the onslaught of possibilities in sound, food, and art. Everyone tries to make the world they see their own. Kids in the Sudan turn to hip-hop to voice their concerns and share their hopes. It is not Tupac’s hip-hop. These kids grew up with it; made it their own. Now wide-eyed Americans find Sudanese hip-hop at their local Border’s. Kids in Harare, Zimbabwe watch Kung Fu movies from Hong Kong, oblivious to the language barriers. The creativity and choreography of the fight scenes inspire these young Zimbabwean film-makers, emboldened by the increasing affordability of video equipment, to go out on the streets and film their own stories.

Cultures are becoming commodities in many ways, and the imbalance of power between the wealthy empires of Coke and BMW tend to overshadow the struggling voices behind Shona sculpture. Everyone interprets the world they receive in their own ways, perpetually surprising one another with new and exciting ways to express their world, repackage it, and offer it up to be swept around the world once again.


Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies
The Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies (EAPS) is the steward of campus-wide teaching, research, programming, and outreach on East Asia, as well as Southeast Asia and the Pacific. EAPS is currently a National Undergraduate Resource Center devoted to the enhancement of campus undergraduate teaching and learning on East Asia and to outreach programming on East Asia for educators, the public, and media and business professionals. EAPS serves over 100 specialists on East Asia, as well as more than 30 off-campus affiliates across the state. For more information, contact Anne Prescott.

Japanese Pop Culture: The Manga/Anime Explosion
Anne Prescott
Associate Director, Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies

Transnational popular culture is not limited to U.S. or European products and trends being spread throughout the world. In the past 10 years, worldwide interest in manga and anime has exploded, and they are being translated and dubbed into many languages and marketed around the world. From Malaysia to Finland and China to the U.S., the young and (and not-so-young) are fascinated by these Japanese media.

Manga, sometimes called graphic novels in the U.S., are much more than their cousins the Superman and Archie comic books; they are the modern-day descendents of Buddhist scrolls and ukiyoe (woodblock prints). In the 12th century, Toba Sojo, a Buddhist priest, created the comical Chojûgiga, or “Animal Scrolls,” which depict animals dressed in Buddhist priests’ clothing, in prayer, reading sutras, and making offerings before the Buddha. In the 17th century zenga, or “zen pictures” became popular, combining comic depictions with religious messages. Famed Japanese ukiyoe artist Hokusai (1760-1849) is credited with coining the term manga in the early nineteenth century, but the term did not come into popular usage until the early twentieth century. “Man” literally means rambling or aimless, and “ga” means “picture.” Together, they imply something that is whimsical or comical. The final piece in the modern day “look” of manga came with the introduction of European and American comics in the late nineteenth century.

In Japan manga are read by people of all ages, and there are many sub-genres targeting various age and gender groups: shojo (girl) manga, shonen (boy) manga; and hentai (abnormal, i.e. pornographic) manga, all have their devotees. The characteristic “look” of manga, exemplified by the large, wide-eyed look, is studied and imitated by many young would-be manga artists throughout the world.

Anime, short for the Japanese pronunciation of the word “animation,” has exploded throughout the world. According to The Financial Times, Japanese anime makes up 60 percent of the world animation market. The works of Miyazaki Hayao (“My Neighbor Totoro,” “Princess Mononoke,” “Spirited Away,” “Howl’s Moving Castle”) are perhaps the best known, and his official website demonstrates the global reach of his work. Between February 12 and March 8, 2007, Queen Silvia of Sweden and U.S. film director Steven Spielberg visited Studio Ghibli Museum in Tokyo; “My Neighbor Totoro” was shown in Norway, Denmark and Russia (in the languages of the respective countries);“Kiki’s Delivery Service” debuted in Finland (in Finnish); and “Tales of the Earthsea” was shown in Taiwan and Poland.

Through manga and anime, Japanese culture, including martial arts, festivals, and religious traditions, have become more familiar to aficionados and have motivated many to pursue Japanese language and culture as amateur devotees or even as a profession. For more information on the history of manga, including examples of historical models from which manga developed as well as translations of portions of popular twentieth century works, see Frederik L. Schodt’s Manga! Manga! The World of Japanese Comics, published by Kodansha International.


European Union Center
The European Union Center (EUC) serves as a bridge of exchange and understanding between residents of the United States and member states of the European Union (EU). The Center brings together faculty and students from across campus to promote the study of the EU, its institutions and policies, and EU-U.S. relations. Working with other campus units and other institutions, the EUC also creates and delivers high-quality programs that serve Illinois businesses, policy makers, high-school teachers and students, and the general public. As one of the most comprehensive EU Centers in the U.S., the Center is the focal point on campus for teaching, research and outreach programs on the EU. For more information, please contact the center.

The Eurovision Song Contest: First Step towards the European Union?
Edward Doherty
Political Science Senior, EU Center Student Assistant

Every spring since 1956, the European Broadcasting Network known as Eurovision puts on the Eurovision Song Contest (ESC), the continent’s biggest display of “talent,” camp, and kitsch. While the artistic merit of the production has steadily grown more dubious, the political and cultural foreshadowing in the expansion of the contest has gathered credibility. Where the United Kingdom press covers the contest with a sardonic relish, the relative-newcomer participant countries in Eastern and Southeastern Europe see the event as an opportunity to show they have culturally rejoined the West. But was Deputy Prime Minister Mykola Tomenko realistic when he proclaimed the ESC to be “a serious step for Ukraine towards the EU (European Union)?1

The Eurovision Song Contest began as a market-expanding project with a veneer of pan-European noble intentions. Since the first contest, held in Lugano, Switzerland, the rules have changed, and the number of participating countries has grown from six to this year’s record of 42. The basic premise, however, has remained: each participating country submits one musical act2 which performs on live television that is broadcast throughout the European Broadcasting Network, and the winning act is that which garners the most points from national voting—a country may not vote for its own act. The voting method has changed over time with improved technology, from the original representational juries to the much broader (and more “democratic”) call-in and Short Message Service voting. With the greater number of submitted acts, a semi-final round was introduced in 2004 to keep the live broadcast within a reasonable time of about three hours. The country with the winning act may then host the contest the next year, and automatically qualifies for the final round with the four other automatic qualifiers: France, Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom.3

The transnational television program holds goals as lofty as being the cultural equivalent of the European Union in uniting the countries of the continent, at least for a few hours. However, in the voting patterns of the contest, pan-European unity is certainly not the case: ever since the inception of the contest, traditionally linked countries tend to vote and support one another, displaying distinct voting cliques—complete with outsiders—that have shown the prejudices participating countries hold for some and against others.4 Despite the appeal towards pan-Europeanism, nationalistic ties and biases still drive the voting in the light-hearted contest.

The East and Southeast may be part of the competition now, but that may just serve to highlight their differences within the European bloc and perhaps play on the popular misgivings about further EU expansion. However, countries hosting the competition lately have used the opportunity to promote themselves, so perhaps the high-profile effort Ukraine put into holding Eurovision 2005 in Kiev has brought the country marginally closer to the European Union. If the exposition did not bring the country closer to the technocratic requirements for entry, at least it projected the issue into hundreds of millions of homes throughout the continent.

Fawkes, Helen. “Ukrainian Hosts’ High Hopes for Eurovision,” BBC News, 19 May 2005.
2 There is an exception: the original contest in 1956 invited each country to submit two acts.
3 These are the largest financial contributors to the European Broadcasting Network, thus they must always compete in the final round.
4 Yair, G., Maman, D. (1996). The Persistent Structure of Hegemony in the Eurovision Song Contest. Acta Sociologica, 39 (3), 309-325.

Resources

Eurovision Wikipedia Entry
BBC Radio 2 Coverage of Eurovision


Center for Global Studies
The Center for Global Studies (CGS) is a National Resource Center for the study of globalization under the Title VI program of the Department of Education. CGS has a four-fold mission: 1) to promote and support research to identify the impacts of globalization on the world’s populations and states and to develop strategies to address global issues; 2) to globalize U of I across its nine colleges and multiple disciplinary and professional units; 3) to make teaching programs related to global studies available to K-16 students and teachers in Illinois and around the country as well as to businesses, professional and civic organizations, media, governmental agencies, and all members of the interested public; and 4). through its FLAS Fellowships and Title VI grant, support the acquisition of advanced language skills and understanding of other cultures for UI students. For more information, please contact the center.

Center for International Business Education and Research
The Illinois Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), one of 31 national resource centers for international business, is a leader in designing and delivering programs that equip future business leaders with language skills, cultural awareness, and the specific business skills needed to be at the vanguard of international business management. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Illinois CIBER coordinates seminars and workshops for professional audiences; funds faculty research on international competitiveness; underwrites development and delivery of new business foreign language courses; develops and sponsors overseas experiences for undergraduate and graduate students; supports an annual international business case competition; serves as a resource for the business community through its website, conferences, and consulting; and administers the Certificate in Global Business Culture with Area Specialization. For more information, please contact the center or visit the CIBER Web site.

Center for Latin American and Caribbean Center
The Centers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Chicago form a U.S. Department of Education National Resource Center consortium to promote Latin American and Caribbean Studies, teacher training, library resources, and expertise in less commonly taught languages throughout the state and beyond. This joint program hosts annual meetings of the Illinois Conference of Latin Americanists, conducts yearly seminars on topics of mutual concern, exchanges faculty and students, shares distinguished visitors and films, and engages in a variety of K-12 activities for schools and the public. The combined resources of the consortium provide one of the largest concentrations of human and material resources on Latin America in the United States. For more information, please contact the center.

Globalization and Andean Musical Migrations
Kirstie Dorr
Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Fellow in African-American Research Program

In the fall of 1991, my Peruvian friend and fellow music aficionado, Guillermo, arrived at our Spanish Literature class with a cassette that he had dubbed for me. Lacking a case or jacket, the tape’s tag simply read “música folklórica” in Memo’s choppy scrawl. Although I enjoyed the album immensely, I never got around to asking Guillermo who the artists were, where they were based, and whether or not they were still together. Thus it struck me as a serendipitous coincidence when I ran into the band, Markahuasi, a year later at the crowded intersection of Telegraph and Bancroft Avenues in Berkeley, California. What I then failed to realize was that the casual run-in was less a matter of coincidence than it was illustrative of the complex intersection of contemporary global restructuring, immigration, and cultural flows: while Memo had purchased Markahuasi’s debut recording during a trip to Peru in the previous year, the album had been recorded and produced in the United States’ Southwest. And for musicians from the Andean highlands of Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador, such complex networks of transnational musical production and exchange were not unusual: in the early 1990s, there were at least as many professional Andean bands living abroad as those living in La Paz, Lima, or Quito.

This brief anecdote elucidates many of the key questions, tensions, and themes informing contemporary studies of cultural globalization. In the past, cultural critics have emphasized the unequal cultural and economic relationships underlying the production of globalized cultural forms such as “world music,” but today, scholars have broadened their analyses to additionally address some of the unanticipated consequences of internationalized cultural production. The above case of Markahuasi’s transnational recording and distribution networks exemplifies such unanticipated consequences. For example, U.S. consumers may be all-too-familiar with the perennial national or continental “world music” compilations sold at Starbucks and Walmart or marketed on iTunes™. However, Markahuasi’s self-promotion via street performance calls our attention to the variety of oppositional strategies employed by Global Southern musicians to contest top-down relations of musical production and distribution in which the greatest benefit accrues to major conglomerates. Furthermore, the oppositional forms of cultural production and distribution illustrated by the above scenario are part of a system of musical travel and translation that is both circuitous and meandering. In other words, the journey of Andean music from the rural highlands of South America to the street corners and subway stations of U.S. global cities defies the common assumption that cultural products and practices from the Global South to Global North is always linear and unidirectional. Finally, and consequently, the case of Markahuasi in particular, and U.S. Andean musicians in general, challenges the common assumption that today’s “world music” is always a watered-down version of something older, more authentic, and more socially and politically meaningful. Rather, it highlights how contemporary musical practices remain crucial tools for engaging in different kinds of political and economic work, whether in the classroom or the recording studio, the Andean village or street corners of the urban United States.


Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
The Program in South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (PSAMES) has just become a National Resource Center for the study and teaching of the Middle East, with a Title VI grant from the Department of Education. PSAMES promotes research and teaching on two regions that, together, comprise one-fifth of humanity and are home to five of the world’s major religions and its earliest civilizations. The program regularly organizes lectures, cultural events, symposia, and conferences concerning current events, political cultures and societies of the Middle East and South Asia, and research on Muslim communities worldwide. PSAMES faculty members have led summer abroad programs in Egypt and India in recent years and the program supports the graduate level study of Middle Eastern languages with Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships. PSAMES is committed to fostering outreach activities for K-12 and the community. For more information, please contact the center or visit the PSAMES Web site.

The Bollywood Aesthetic
Ritu Saksena
Associate Director, PSAMES

Bollywood, the Hindi commercial film industry based in Mumbai (formerly Bombay), annually produces the largest number of films worldwide. While the term Bollywood is clearly derivative, the differences between it and Hollywood could not be starker. Bollywood films can trace their distinguishing characteristics to influences as diverse as folk theatre from different parts of India—the Yatra from Bengal, the Tamasha from Maharashtra, the Ram-Lila from Uttar Pradesh, the Nautanki from Rajasthan—as well as the two great Indian epics, the Ramayana and the Mahabharata. For understanding issues of popular culture in India and its transnational scope and reach, Bollywood, with its wide reaching appeal, is the best example to draw on. Bollywood homogenizes India’s vast linguistic, cultural, regional and class differences, creating a supra-national identity with no regional or cultural moorings. And yet, many would consider it uniquely Indian.

Much scholarship exists on this phenomenon that is Bollywood. The focus of transnational cultural studies is the production, reception, reconfiguration and reemergence of a hybrid pop culture in a more global context. While most of this cultural exchange has been from the center to the periphery mirroring the colonial context, Bollywood has, to a great extent, reversed this trend. The diasporic Indian populations in Britain and the United States have contributed largely to the mass appeal of the stars of the Mumbai film industry in the West today. Select film theatres in every major city in the U.S. screen Bollywood films to packed audiences, a complete experience including samosas for snacks. Even Urbana-Champaign and Bloomington-Normal have regular screenings of Bollywood’s big blockbuster draws. Bollywood has spawned several major offshoots like the popular music industry in India and the megastage show galas around the world with live performances by leading stars. Andrew Lloyd Weber’s Broadway show, Bombay Dreams, drawing on this same aesthetic, opened to packed houses in 2004. Bollywood has thus been celebrated on Broadway, inspired haute couture, and its music is now finding its way into mainstream television shows in the U.S.

Known for blockbuster melodramas, with song and dance sequences and formulaic scripts, Bollywood provides to film lovers a true visual spectacle. Alternatively, I would call it a cinema of excess. Quite unlike Hollywood’s musicals, the narratives in these films incorporate visual and audio excesses which subtly transform any narrative disjunctures or ruptures into blips, and invite the audience to soak up its audiovisual vibrancy. Aamir Khan’s debut film Lagaan, which in 2002 became the third Indian film to win a nomination in the foreign film category at the Oscars, also introduced Bollywood to larger audiences. In its intertwining of the twin themes of cricket and colonialism, Lagaan evoked strong nationalistic responses in India and abroad.
Teaching Bollywood cinema has since acquired legitimacy in the academy. These films are easily available as rentals in stores and online, and most come with subtitles.

Selected Resources:
Central Board of Film Certification, India
BBC Bollywood Page
Masters of Cinema
Film Education: Deepa Mehta's Earth

Alessandrini, Anthony C. “My Heart’s Indian for All That: Bollywood Film between Home and Diaspora.” Diaspora: A Journal of Transnational Studies 10:3 (2001)
Barnouw, Erik and S. Krishnaswamy. Indian Film. New York: Oxford University Press, 1980.
Rajadhyaksha, Ashish and Willemen, Paul. An Encyclopedia of Indian Cinema. New York: Oxford University Press, 1999.


Russian, East European and Eurasian Center
The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center is a U.S. Department of Education-designated National Resource Center, committed to providing information and service to K-16 teachers. If you are interested in the center’s workshops, onsite presentations, or curricular materials, please contact the center or visit the REEEC Web site. The Web site features a special section for K-12 teachers under Outreach, which includes an extensive annotated bibliography of resources, information on the center’s multimedia lending library, annotated links to relevant Web sites, and more.

Echoes of the Soviet Union
Greg Kveberg, Ph.D. Candidate, History

With the end of the Soviet government, western goods and ideas, which had been steadily trickling into Russia for decades, came flooding in. However, the world of the Soviet Union was not washed away overnight. Symbols, ideas, memories and artifacts survive—Soviet mosaics decorate the metro, Stalinist architecture still dominates the Moscow skyline, and memories and ideas about life in the Soviet Union still linger in the minds of Russians, and mix with ideas from the West.

Perhaps the most important western import to the Soviet Union was rock music. Almost everyone who came of age during the last decade of the Soviet Union spent much of their free time hunting for, copying, sharing, listening to, and often making rock music. It quickly became the dominant musical genre in post-Soviet Russia. MTV opened a Russian branch, which has been wildly successful. Russian artists began to produce extraordinary music—sometimes in western styles, sometimes in hybrid styles, drawing on both western and Russian traditions. Oleg Gazmanov and Dolphin both make use of Soviet symbols in their music, but for very different purposes.

Oleg Gazmanov’s song Sdelan v SSSR (Made in the USSR) is tremendously popular. On stage, he appears much like a Russian Bruce Springsteen, whose style he emulates. His music, however, is all about Russian nationalism. This song opens with a list of the places that are part of “his country,” including, ominously, most of the now-independent former Soviet republics. Its chorus “I was born in the Soviet Union, I was made in the USSR” is powerful, catchy, and a favorite among fans. Gazmanov not wholly Soviet in his outlook, however—he’s perfectly willing to accept ‘oligarchs and the poor’ and ‘new cathedrals’ as part of his country. He has won a string of awards for his work, and has been honored by both the Patriarch and Putin. He borrows symbols from the Soviet past to strengthen feelings of Russian nationalism in the present, and his music appeals to Russians who are eager to recapture the power and status that they enjoyed during the Soviet era, if not the Soviet Union’s social policies.

Dolphin’s work is very different. Dolphin himself is more of a cultural hybrid. He began his career as a rap/hip-hop musician in the final days of the Soviet Union, but has moved away from these roots, and his music now resembles trip-hop. His work is dark, moody and poetic, much like that of bands such as Massive Attack or Portishead. Recently, for the song Vesna (spring), Dolphin created a music video using footage from the 1980 summer Olympics in Moscow. The video shows the city, spectators and athletes, and concludes with the closing ceremonies, during which Misha (the bear who was the mascot of the games) flies away into the sky beneath a cluster of balloons, while a middle-aged woman in the crowd holds her hands and cries. The video is bittersweet, poignant, and nostalgic. It captures a very different image of life in the Soviet Union than Gazmanov’s songs do—one that is gentler and more personal—and also, like Misha, gone forever.

Russian rock culture, with its heavy western influences, is still trying to figure out what to do with the legacy of the Soviet Union. The quiet, mournful and respectful nostalgia of Dolphin and the fiery nationalist rhetoric and images of Gazmanov are definitely not the only possible answers. The question itself is going to change, too, as time marches on—after all, most of the young Russians listening to MTV have no real living memory of the Soviet Union.

REEEC Summer Events:
Saturday, June 9—Tuesday, June 12
SUMMER RESEARCH LABORATORY on Russia, Eastern Europe and Eurasia

Thursday, June 14—Saturday, June 16
2007 RALPH AND RUTH FISHER FORUM
“Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn as Writer, Myth-Maker and Public Figure in the 21st Century”

314 Illini Union

Tuesday, June 26—Thursday, June 28
CENTRAL ASIA-CAUCASUS STUDIES TRAINING WORKSHOP FOR JUNIOR SCHOLARS
“From Chechnya to Kabul: New Directions in Central Asian and Caucasus Studies”
Moderator: Douglas Northrop (History and Near Eastern Studies, University of Michigan)

Wednesday, June 27—Friday, June 29
BALKAN STUDIES TRAINING WORKSHOP FOR JUNIOR SCHOLARS
“Building Balkan Studies: Integrating Multidisciplinary Perspectives”
Moderator: Victor Friedman (Slavic Languages and Literatures and Linguistics, University of Chicago)


Other Studies Centers

Program in Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security
Website: www.acdis.illinois.edu
Phone: 217-333-7086
Fax: 217-244-5157
E-mail: acdis@illinois.edu

Women and Gender in Global Perspectives
Website: www.ips.illinois.edu/wggp
Phone: (217) 333-1994
Fax: (217) 265-0810
E-mail: kcmartin@illinois.edu

Freeman Fellows Program Contributes to Cross-Cultural Understanding between China and the US

Emily Lewis
Coordinator, Freeman Fellows Program

freeman fellows K.JPGEach July for the past 11 years, a group of young humanities and social science professors from China has arrived on the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign campus to begin their year-long tenure as Freeman Fellows. Generously supported by the Freeman
Foundation and administered by the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies (EAPS), the Freeman Fellows program gives these scholars the opportunity to participate in the American intellectual community, conducting research and making contacts at Illinois and beyond that will benefit both sides for years to come. Since its inception, 151 Fellows, representing 11 universities, have enriched our campus community.

The Freeman Fellows program is comprised of several components, each designed to assist these visitors in learning more about academic life at Illinois as well as broadening their knowledge of American life and culture. It also includes opportunities for these scholars to serve as resources for the campus and local communities in order for them to learn more about China.

One of the primary goals of the Freeman Fellows Program is to assist the participants in intellectual growth through research collaboration. Each Freeman Fellow comes to Illinois with a research plan that includes specific goals that will be attained through resources available at Illinois. In addition to auditing classes of interest, each Fellow is matched with a faculty partner who has similar research interests. The faculty partners facilitate the intellectual integration of the Freeman Fellows on campus by meeting with the Chinese scholars and introducing them to other faculty members on campus in their discipline. These partnerships have enriched both parties, and a number of the pairs have conducted or are conducting joint research as well as making plans for future cooperation. These collaborations have resulted in a number of public presentations, including “The 21st Century Chinese University: A Panel Discussion,” “The U.S. Media on China’s Economic Ascendance,” and “Democracy, the Absence of Truth.”

Another integral part of the Freeman Fellows program is a weekly two-hour seminar, which is lead by an Illinois faculty member or community expert. Topics have ranged from Abraham Lincoln to American Music and African-American Literature to Religious Diversity in the U.S. Some of these presentations then lead to field trips to Springfield, Memphis, Chicago and Indianapolis, offering the Freeman Fellows a chance to experience more of American life and culture.

Regular participation in professional activities is another important part of the program. Freeman Fellows attend campus lectures and meetings, and receive funding to participate in national and international conferences, where they may participate in panels or present scholarly papers.
Opportunities for community interaction are also a part of the Freeman Fellows program. Through the efforts of the International Hospitality Committee and community volunteers Joe and Joyce Peacock, each visiting scholar is matched with a host family, who assist the Fellows in becoming comfortable with life in Urbana-Champaign by introducing them to the area, answering questions about life in the U.S., and including them in meals and special family events. During the first semester of their stay at Illinois, the Peacocks also arrange a number of “cross-cultural conversations” for the scholars. Each Monday afternoon they gather at a home in the university neighborhood for a lively discussion on a given topic, and for the past two years the group has been delighted that University of Illinois President White and his wife have opened their home for one of these meetings.

In a new venture in spring 2007, a number of the Freeman Fellows have collaborated with Illinois professors Poshek Fu (History) and C.Y. Chiu (Psychology) to offer a graduate seminar on Popular Culture and Self-Identity in Greater China. Also new this academic year, the Freeman Fellows Advisory Committee, comprised of eighteen faculty members from across campus, provides guidance and suggestions as we continue to strive to make this program the best it can be for our visitors.

Many former Freeman Fellows have remained in touch with EAPS and with each other, and a number of formal and informal Freeman Fellows reunions have occurred in China. We hope to soon provide a Web-based system for the Freeman Fellow alums so that they can continue to network and share ideas after their return to China. In addition, Freeman Fellow universities have hosted delegations from Illinois departments of education, communication and law. In November 2006, former Freeman Fellow Wang Handong, Wuhan University, brought four of his faculty colleagues to campus for discussions on future student-to-student collaborations as well as a public presentation on the history of Chinese media.

The Freeman scholars, faculty partners, general university community, and beyond have all benefited from the presence of the Freeman Fellows program at Illinois and as China becomes more important to Illinois and the United States, these young scholars’ presence will continue to contribute to intellectual collaboration and mutual understanding.

November 28, 2007

Resources for K-16 Teachers

Center for African Studies
Center for Global Studies
Center for International Business Education and Research
Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies
European Union Center
Russian, East European and Eurasian Center



Center for African Studies
The Center for African Studies’ Engagement and Outreach Program is designed to increase public knowledge about Africa and to enhance the broader community’s understanding of African peoples and cultures. Our programming serves K-12 schools, community colleges, the media, community groups, the business community, and the general public. For more information, please contact the center at african@illinois.edu.

New Resources in African Studies
New Africa Resource Kits for Elementary Schools
Trying on a school uniform, using adrinkra stamps, or handling a calabash, akuba fertility doll, or prayer beads can stir a child’s imagination when a topic seems otherwise abstract or distant. Harbert Jones, an K-5th grade fine arts teacher, and Marcia Richards, a 5th grade classroom teacher, worked on three touch kits and curriculum units that would help bring African materials, history, and society to life in elementary school classrooms. Working with African Studies and the Krannert Art Museum, they sorted through numerous artifacts and books this summer.

They compiled materials that would intrigue young learners and fit into the curriculum. They narrowed the resources down to units on “Fine Arts and Islam in West Africa,” “Children’s Lives in Ghana,” and “Textiles in Africa.” The units include a diverse collection of resources—books, games, toys, fabrics, outfits, proverbs, household objects, and paintings. The objects are also cross-referenced between texts, images, and curriculum projects. The kits will begin to circulate in 2008. Contact: Krannert Art Museum at (217) 333-8218.

Children’s Africana Book Awards 2007
The Outreach Council of the African Studies Association is pleased to announce the winners of the 2007 Children’s Africana Book Awards. The council annually honors outstanding authors and illustrators of children’s books about Africa published in the United States.

Best Book for Young Children 2007: I Lost My Tooth in Africa, by Penda Diakite and Baba Wague Diakite (illus.). Scholastic Press, 2007.
I Lost My Tooth in Africa is a vibrant, lively story about eight year old Amina, who takes a long journey from America to Africa to visit her family in Mali. When Amina looses her tooth in Mali, places it under a gourd and tangles with the African tooth-fairy, she learns that growing up is also about responsibility.

Best Book for Older Readers 2007: The Illustrator’s Notebook, by Mohieddin Ellabbad. Groundwood Books, 2006.
The famous Egyptian illustrator Mohieddin Ellabbad presents his “notebook” which shares how he grew up and took on his profession. He uses text, photographs, drawings, and Arabic script to communicate his aspirations as an artist. Most compelling are the questions he raises for readers, such as “Where do stories come from?” and “How does the way you feel affect the way you draw?” Younger readers will be delighted by how he combines images and shows the change in his country over time. In this wonderfully creative and unique book, Ellabbad offers Egyptian history, breaks stereotypes, shares his personal story, and inspires readers to reflect upon their own experiences.

Honor Book for Young Children 2007: My Father’s Shop, by Satomi Ichikawa. Kane/Miller Book Publishers, 2006.
In Satomi Ichikawa’s delightful and colorful story, we follow the adventure of young Mustafa as he learns about his father’s trade as a rug seller in a southern Moroccan town and about communicating with others, which in this case, are tourists from around the world.



Center for Global Studies
The Center for Global Studies (CGS) supports research and outreach on the impacts of globalization—an ever-widening process of increasing interdependence of peoples and states that puts the world at risk, yet opens new and exciting opportunities for improvements in the lives of people everywhere. As a Department of Education funded National Resource Center, CGS offers global studies educational opportunities to the university community, K-12 teachers and students, and the public; and offers grants to support learning advanced language skills and understanding of other cultures. CGS also administers the International High School Initiative. For more information, please contact Karen Hewitt, Outreach Coordinator: khewitt@illinois.edu, 217-244-0288 or visit the Center’s Web site.

Global Studies Resources for Educators
American Forum for Global Education
This site is not the most current, yet it still provides a searchable database of teaching materials and full-text access to Issues in Global Education/Occasional Papers. Registration is required to use the database, but it is free of charge.

Caretakers of the Environment International
This site is a global network for secondary school teachers and students interested in environmental education. The group holds annual conferences around the world and provides links to their online journal, The Global Forum.

CyberSchoolBus
Created by the United Nations, this Web site offers curriculum materials and links to information sources both teachers and students can use in the classroom. The site also highlights international conferences or competitions for students.

Education Planet
Education Planet offers a listing of links related to global education. Lesson plans are included on the Web site, but require a paid membership.

Global Education Checklist
The Global Education Checklist was developed by global education professionals and complements the state and national international studies teaching standards. This is a link to an article featured in No. 173 of the Occasional Papers from the American Forum of Global Education (2002-2003).

GlobalSchoolNet
This site offers online project-based learning activities on the international level that teachers can incorporate into their curriculum. The Collaborative Learning Center links to information and resources on specific technologies used in some of the projects. Upcoming international conferences and events for students are also listed.

iEARN
iEARN unites K-12 educators and students across the globe by jointly working on classroom projects using the Internet and other new technologies. iEARN offers online professional development courses; costs to participate in iEARN depend on the educator’s location.

Outreach World
This site offers searchable curriculum resources, travel opportunities and event listing related to teaching international and area studies and foreign languages for K-16.

Model UN Program
This site fosters the development of Model United Nations, which is an authentic simulation of the U.N. General Assembly and other multilateral bodies.

Peace Corps’ World Wise Schools
Sponsored by the Peace Corps, World Wise Schools contains free lesson plans, multimedia, service learning, enrichment programs and educational standards on incorporating international studies in the K-16 classroom.

PlanetEdu
This site contains links to a variety of international studies resources, including links to graduate school programs, internships, travel aboard opportunities and more. Use the search option to see more results.

Telecollaborative Learning: Global Awareness
This article is a feature on telecollaborative learning activity between middle school students in the Canada and Israel. The article is featured in the archives of Education World (www.education-world.com).

Thinkfinity
This site offers a variety of standard-based educational content for K-12 educators through the Lesson Plan Index. The site also promotes professional development with continuing technology training.



Center for International Business Education and Research
The Illinois Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER), one of 31 national resource centers for international business, is a leader in designing and delivering programs that equip future business leaders with language skills, cultural awareness, and the specific business skills needed to be at the vanguard of international business management. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Illinois CIBER coordinates seminars and workshops for professional audiences; funds faculty research on international competitiveness; underwrites development and delivery of new business foreign language courses; develops and sponsors overseas experiences for undergraduate and graduate students; supports an annual international business case competition; serves as a resource for the business community through its Web site, conferences, and consulting; and administers the Certificate in Global Business Culture with Area Specialization. For more information, please contact the center at ciber@business.illinois.edu or visit our Web site.

International Business: Exercises, Mini-Cases, and Mini-Research Projects, is a book written by Gary Lefort, a professor at American International College in Springfield, MA, that is targeted for high school students. The book was funded by the University of Connecticut Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) and is designed for student use. It features a compilation of international business exercises, mini-research projects, and mini-cases that have been developed to enrich the student’s learning experience in the classroom. The book covers many topics, including international business, cultural diversity, international financial management, and international law. There are 15 exercises which are broken down into word puzzles, crossword puzzles, and flow charts that try to make learning international business fun; five mini-research projects which are designed to get the student more involved in the classroom and to reinforce what they have learned in class; and 20 mini-case studies which are designed to bring the real world to the classroom. This book is a valuable resource which will help students get more involved in the classroom, and to see the linkage between what they are learning in the classroom and what is happening in the world.

The University of Connecticut CIBER can provide copies at a cost of $35 (add $2 for the instructor’s manual CD). They may be reached by telephone at (860) 486-5458, by email at ciber.general@business.uconn.edu or by mail at 2100 Hillside Road Unit 1041, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-1041.



Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies
In consortium with the Center for Latin America Studies at the University of Chicago, the Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies (CLACS) at Illinois is a National Resource Center for Latin American Studies funded by the U.S. Department of Education through the Title VI program. The combined resources of the consortium provide one of the largest concentrations of human and material resources on Latin America in the United States. The center’s mission is to increase knowledge and awareness of Latin America and the Caribbean in the educational community and the general public.

CLACS Outreach Library
CLACS has launched its first outreach library with the goal of assisting teachers and patrons with K-12 materials on Latin America. All materials below, among many other resources, are available at our library. For more information, contact Outreach Coordinator Renata Johnson at renata@illinois.edu or (217) 244-2790, or visit the Web site.

Books
Kaufman, Cheryl D. 2002. Cooking the Caribbean Way. Lerner Publications Company.
Cooking the Caribbean Way serves up tantalizing recipes for hearty stews, refreshing coconut ice, sweet potato pone and more. Also part of our CLACS Outreach Library: Cooking the Brazilian Way, Cooking the Mexican Way, Cooking the South American Way, and Cooking the Central American Way. Age: K-12.

Brown, Monica and Parra, John. 2005. My Name is, Me Llamo, Gabriela—The Life of, La Vida de, Gabriela Mistral. Luna Rising Books.
This bilingual book is a beautiful tribute to Gabriela Mistral, the first Latin American to win a Nobel Prize of Literature. A diplomat and educator, Mistral taught her students about the power of words and the importance of following their dreams. Age: K-5

Films
Mexico for Children. VHS. Directed by Fink Productions. Schlessinger Media, 2004.
This is a three-volume set about Mexico’s culture, geography and history. Volume 1, The Culture of Mexico, focuses on the rich cultural heritage of Mexico and how it affects the daily lives of its citizens. Students will find that Mexico’s indigenous people and Spanish rule have influenced the ceremonial dress, folktales, foods, and holidays of Mexico. Volume 2, The Geography of Mexico, focuses on how Mexico’s geography has shaped its history, society, and culture. Travel from the desert in Sonora to the lush rainforests of Chiapas and learn about diversity of the Gulf Coast region. Volume 3, The History of Mexico, focuses on the obstacles that Mexico has overcome throughout history to become an independent, self-governing nation. Running time: 24 min. Age: Elementary School

Spanish History—A Continent Conquered. VHS. Produced by Ed Dubrowsky. Video Knowledge Learning Library, 2004.
From the Caribbean Sea to the tip of the continent of South America, the history, power and culture of Spain lives today, and is to be seen from one end of the continent to the other. Who are the people of Venezuela, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, and Chile today? This program presents a look at the Hispanic nations of South America. Recommended by the New York City Board of Education. Running time: 28 min. Age: Middle and High Schools.



Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
The Center for South Asian and Middle Eastern Studies (CSAMES) is a U.S. Department of Education-designated National Resource Center for the study and teaching of the Middle East. As an area studies program, our research and teaching covers a very expansive part of the globe, a region that is home to about one-fifth of the world’s population and the cradle of some of the world’s oldest religions and civilizations. The center’s mission is to facilitate scholarship on South Asia and the Middle East by regularly organizing lectures, symposia and conferences.

Middle East Outreach
Our outreach program reflects our commitment to help increase awareness about the countries that comprise the Middle East, deconstructing popular religious and cultural stereotypes; we offer a variety of pedagogical tools to introduce different facets of the life in Middle Eastern nations in K-12 classrooms. These curriculum units on culture and daily life in the Middle East are resources structured for flexibility to be used individually or in conjunction with other units we have developed. Our modules focus on the diverse cultural heritage, scientific and economic developments and literary achievements of 28 countries that together form the larger Middle East. We have an annotated bibliography for our small library collection and a list of other artifacts available for borrowing. For every module, we have tried to provide a bibliography of additional materials to enhance the teaching of that particular unit.
For more information, please visit our Web site.

How can these units be used?
Our curriculum units are designed such that they can be used as is or downloaded and fine-tuned to suit the appropriate intellectual level of engagement as required by the teacher. Each unit has an informative component which can be treated as a resource for comprehensive information for middle school classes or as a starting point for research into a particular subject for the higher grade levels. The lesson plans are interactive and informative and formatted such that they can be printed out for direct use in classroom instruction.

Fact Sheets, Capitals, Flags and Currency
Catalogued country-wise, these individual sections provide information like the population, ethnicity, climate and language for 28 countries. They offer snippets of information on the various capital cities along with crosswords and word finds to get every student actively involved. The flags section illustrates each country’s choice of colors and insignia and examines the reasons behind these choices. The currency section similarly offers basic information on currency bills for all countries and shows the comparative exchange rate with the US dollar.

Other Units
We have a varied blend of cultural, social, traditional and religious issues that we discuss in relative depth to entice a curious mind into wanting to learn more. We offer several hands-on activities, like making a Ramadan lamp or use popular gaming to involve the student traveler in their intellectual journey through the Middle East and the Islamic world. Using literature, history, geography, and science we have adapted these units to be effective ambassadors for the socio-cultural heritage of these nations, heralding a deeper understanding of unknown cultures.



Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies
The Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies (EAPS) is the steward of campus-wide teaching, research, programming, and outreach on East Asia, as well as Southeast Asia and the Pacific. EAPS is currently a National Undergraduate Resource Center devoted to the enhancement of campus undergraduate teaching and learning on East Asia and to outreach programming on East Asia for educators, the public, and media and business professionals. EAPS serves over 100 specialists on East Asia, as well as more than 30 off-campus affiliates across the state. For more information, contact Anne Prescott at aprescot@illinois.edu.

2008 Beijing Olympics Focuses Interest on Modern China—Resources for the Classroom
With the Beijing Olympics less than a year away, all eyes seem to be focused on China these days. Using the Olympics as a springboard into discussions about modern China is a great first step, but where do you go from there? With all of the resources available, how do you know what’s good and what isn’t?

First, there are many outdated books and videos circulating. Over just the past ten years, China has changed dramatically; the changes since the late 1970s are mind-boggling. So the first hint is to look at the copyright or production date. Some older materials might have value when discussing the dizzying speed of changes in China, but many students (and teachers) think that what they see or read about 1980s China is the way it is today. One of the most common reactions of American visitors to China is, “Where are the Communists?” Expecting to see hordes of people dressed in bland Mao jackets and riding bicycles (images still circulating in outdated resources widely available in the US), they’re surprised by the cell phones, Starbucks, and Buick dealerships.

So how does a teacher find up-to-date information? A great place to start would be to talk with one of the Chinese scholars that EAPS hosts each year through the Freeman Fellows program. This year we have ten young professors from a variety of disciplines, all of whom speak excellent English, on our campus until June 2008. All of them are more than willing to talk with teachers about what China is like today, and it may be possible to schedule classroom visits as well. To arrange a meeting or classroom visit, contact EAPS at eaps@illinois.edu or (217) 333-7273. Please let us know what and where you teach.

Another place to go is the Asian Educational Media Service (AEMS). Teachers in the immediate Urbana-Champaign area may visit their office at 805 W. Pennsylvania Ave., and browse through their collection of videos, DVDs and curriculum units on China. Anyone can use their Web site to browse their extensive database, which includes reviews of materials and lesson plans. For more personalized assistance, they also welcome phone inquiries at (888) 828-2367.

Of particular interest might be the following videos, DVDs and CD-ROMs which focus on China and were produced since 2001. More information on all of them is available on the Web site.

Contemporary Chinese Societies: Continuity and Change
This highly-rated CD-ROM from 2001 has materials that are adaptable to any grade level, from elementary through college. An extensive review of this item is available on the AEMS website.

The Enduring Legacy of Ancient China: Primary Source Lessons for Teachers and Students is for 5th-9th grade students. With self-contained lessons, this curriculum unit offers teachers the flexibility to use any or all of the lessons in any order they choose. Carefully selected authentic materials give students a unique opportunity to learn from original sources. The unit includes more than 250 full-color images, texts, and music.

China from the Inside
This PBS series of four documentaries (Power and the People; Women of the Country; Shifting Nature; and Freedom and Justice) looks at China through Chinese eyes. An added bonus is the educator resources available on the Web site.

China’s Mega Dam from the Discovery Channel
The Three Gorges Dam on the Yangtze River in China is the largest public works project in the history of mankind. The Discovery Channel cameras were granted exclusive access to the site, and this film documents the dramatic effects this massive construction project has and will have on the surrounding countryside.

A State of Mind
Although it’s about North Korea, not China, it is a very revealing look at the inner workings of mass games and might generate interesting discussions on the function of the Olympic games in modern society.

There are also numerous Web sites with lesson plans and more. One of the best is the Asia Society’s Ask Asia. Other useful links can be found on the EAPS Web site under “Links for Teachers” (www.eaps.illinois.edu; click on “links” and then “for teachers”).

And as always, the staff at EAPS is ready to help you find the answers to your questions. You can contact us at eaps@illinois.edu or (217) 333-7273.



European Union Center
The European Union Center (EUC) serves as a bridge of exchange and understanding between residents of the United States and member states of the European Union (EU). The center brings together faculty and students from across campus to promote the study of the EU, its institutions and policies, and EU-US relations. Working with other campus units and other institutions, the EUC also creates and delivers high-quality programs that serve Illinois businesses, policy makers, high-school teachers and students, and the general public. As one of the most comprehensive EU Centers in the US, the center is the focal point on campus for teaching, research and outreach programs on the EU. For more information, please contact the center at (217) 265-7515.

About the European Union
The European Union is a colossal giant of bureaucracy, programs, administrators and constituents. Its very nature—27 independent nations ceding parts of their sovereignty to form a “supernational” state—demands an interdisciplinary approach from educators and scholars. The European Union encompasses many fields, including political science, international relations, economics, law, trade, agriculture and finance. At times, the amount of data to sift through can at times seem overwhelming, but there are ways to avoid confusion and the European Union Center can offer several good places to start.

Online Resources
Europa.eu is the portal site of the European Union, and the first place to check for official legislation and treaties of the EU. It provides coverage on breaking affairs and is a solid resource for many basic facts. A few particularly helpful pages within europa.eu are:

Europe: Panorama
This page gives a brief and simple overview of the European Union.

Europe: 12 Lessons
This page delves a little more into the basics of the EU. It covers necessary background information, from explaining the history of the EU to deciphering Eurojargon, breaking up the pieces into 12 clear and accessible sections.

Euobserver.com is an online newspaper with a cast of international contributors. Always up-to-date and constantly changing, it is a particularly good place to look for opinion pieces specifically dealing with the latest EU news from those who live within the EU.

European Union—Delegation of the European Commission to the USA
A Web site about the European Union geared specifically toward American citizens.

Café Babel
Europe’s current affairs magazine. Heavy on culture and introspection of Europe’s past.

Local Resources
The European Union Center has a select library of European Union materials, including books, pamphlets and videos. A list of materials can be found on our Web site.

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has an extensive collection of European Union materials, including the Law library’s collection of European Union documents. A good place to search the University’s library resources for European Union information is the European Union Library Resource Center. This page was created with a particular design to help the researcher through statistical data.

Also available through the University library is WorldData, which provides current and thorough economic and market data. It is a comprehensive database covering 150 countries in 45 regions. It can be found within the Online Research Resources from the University Library Gateway.



Russian, East European and Eurasian Center
The Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center is a U.S. Department of Education-designated National Resource Center, committed to providing information and service to K-16 teachers. If you are interested in the center’s workshops, onsite presentations, or curricular materials, please contact the center at reec@illinois.edu or visit the REEEC Web site. The Web site features a special section for K-12 teachers under Outreach, which includes an extensive annotated bibliography of resources, information on the center’s multimedia lending library, annotated links to relevant Web sites, and more.

Print resources
Dando, William A. Russia, 2nd ed. Chelsea House, 2007. Grades 9-10.
The textbook presents a geographical perspective on tsarist Russia, the USSR, and the current Russian Federation. The book concludes with short, largely optimistic chapters on reconstructing socioeconomic unity and Russia’s great potential.

Ericson, Jr., Edward and Daniel J. Mahoney (eds). The Solzhenitsyn Reader: New and Essential Writings 1947–2005. Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 2006.
This reader, compiled with the cooperation of the Solzhenitsyn family represents in one volume a significant selection of Solzhenitsyn’s voluminous output.

Goldman, Minton. Global Studies: Russia, The Eurasian Republics, and Central/Eastern Europe, 11th edition. McGraw-Hill/Dushkin, 2007.
This latest edition features country report essays and maps as well as relevant articles.

Hollander, Paul (ed). From the Gulag to the Killing Fields: Personal Accounts of Political Violence and Repression in Communist States. Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 2006.
This volume is the first to collect, country by country, the writings of forty-two individuals who share their experience of life under Communism, both past and present.

Minahan, James. The Former Soviet Union’s Diverse Peoples: A Reference Sourcebook (Ethnic Diversity within Nations). ABC-CLIO, 2004.
A useful reference book on diverse ethnic groups in the former Soviet Union.

Moore, Andrew. Russia. Chronicle Books, 2005.
A stunning book of photos of Russia today.

Smorodinskaya, Tatiana et al. Encyclopedia of Contemporary Russian Culture. Taylor & Francis Group, 2007.

This single volume on Russian culture, in which the editors define contemporary as from Stalin’s death in 1953 to the present day, includes more than 1,000 entries.

Film Resources
Animated Soviet Propaganda: From the October Revolution to Perestroika. Jove Film, 2006.
Fascinating 4-dvd collection of Soviet animated propaganda films. Most shorts are under 15 minutes, so it would be easy to pull out one or two for teaching purposes. With English subtitles.

Families of the World Series: Families of Russia. Master Communications, 2005. 30 minutes. Gr. K-6.
A view of everyday lives of two Russian children and their families, one living in a city and other in the countryside. The video would be useful for elementary/middle school classroom. In English.

Web sites
Russian Chronicles
A journalist and photographer travel from Vladivostok to St. Petersburg in 1995, filing interesting personal stories and pictures directly onto the webpage. They filed excellent pieces, especially “100 Years of Revolutions” under Road Stories—St. Petersburg.

Russian Chronicles—Ten Years Later
The same journalist from 1995 returns to Russia in 2005 with a photographer to see if she can retrace her steps and interview the same people from the 1995 Chronicles (see above).

Participating teachers’ blogs from the REEEC Fulbright-Hays seminar in Russia are full of interesting stories about Russian everyday life.

REEEC-developed Lesson Plans
A module on “Russian Energy in the Modern World,” developed in conjunction with the Center for Global Studies

Lesson plan for “Integrating Literature into the Study of Russian History,” by Jessica W. Barranco, Phoenix Country Day School, Arizona

About Global Engagement

This page contains an archive of all entries posted to Illinois International Review, University of Illinois in the Global Engagement category. They are listed from oldest to newest.

The Academic Nook is the previous category.

The World of Protocol is the next category.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.

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